Georgia Bulldogs: C.J. Uzomah

Ranking the SEC tight ends

June, 11, 2014
Jun 11
4:30
PM ET
We started the day by ranking all 14 teams based on their receivers and tight ends. Next, we looked at the top 10 wide receivers in the SEC. Now it’s time to look at the top 10 tight ends.

[+] EnlargeO.J. Howard
AP Photo/Butch DillO.J. Howard figures to play a bigger role in Alabama's offense in 2014.
1. O.J. Howard, So., Alabama: He’s big, he’s strong and boy is he athletic. There were times last season when Howard looked unstoppable. Linebackers were too slow to keep up with him and cornerbacks were too small to cover him one on one. But he was underutilized as a freshman, failing to catch a pass in five games. With Lane Kiffin now running the offense and a new quarterback under center, Howard won’t go unnoticed as a sophomore.

2. Hunter Henry, So., Arkansas: Even without any consistency at quarterback, Henry emerged as one of the most promising young tight ends in the country as a true freshman last year, a pass-catcher who wasn't afraid to go over the middle. He finished with 28 catches for 409 yards and four touchdowns, and this year coaches are expecting even more.

3. Evan Engram, So., Ole Miss: Injuries clouded an otherwise eye-opening rookie campaign. He started last season on a tear with 20 catches and four touchdowns through seven games and then missed the final five games of the regular season. If he has a clean bill of health, he’s the type of hybrid receiver-tight end who can flourish in Hugh Freeze’s offense and complement Laquon Treadwell on the outside.

4. Jake McGee, Sr., Florida: The Gators' outlook at tight end went from bleak to rosy in one stroke when McGee transferred from Virginia, where he was the Cavs' leading receiver last season. At 6-6, 255, he gives quarterback Jeff Driskel a veteran safety net he can turn to in a pinch. Last season at UVA, McGee got a first down or touchdown on 26 of his 43 receptions.

5. Malcolm Johnson, Sr., Mississippi State: When he arrived in Starkville, Johnson was a three-star wide receiver who weighed only 200 pounds. Now, four years later, he’s 231 pounds and considered one of the better tight ends in the conference. He not only has evolved into a tight end, he ha become more productive every year. He had his best season yet last year with 30 catches for 391 yards and two touchdowns.

6. Rory Anderson, Sr., South Carolina: The only question with Anderson is his health. He tore his triceps during spring practice, but the Gamecocks are optimistic that he will be ready for the season. He's a big-play target at tight end who has averaged 17.8 yards per catch during his career and had five touchdowns as a sophomore.

[+] EnlargeJay Rome
Todd Kirkland/Icon SMIGeorgia's Jay Rome, who was the top-ranked tight end in the Class of 2011, has 20 career catches for the Bulldogs.
7. Jay Rome, Jr., Georgia: Everybody is excited about incoming freshman Jeb Blazevich, but don’t sleep on Rome. He only had nine catches last year, but he played behind Arthur Lynch and missed the final four games with an injury. At 6-foot-6, 254 pounds, Rome will provide a big target for quarterback Hutson Mason, and be an asset in the rushing game.

8. Cameron Clear, Sr., Texas A&M: Kevin Sumlin’s wide-open up-tempo offense doesn’t have an extensive history of using tight ends but he hasn’t always had the kind of premier player at the position to utilize. Clear, a massive 6-6, 274-pounder who can move well for his size, gives the Aggies a matchup advantage at the position. He wasn’t used often in his first year on campus, but look for his role to expand this fall under new offensive coordinator Jake Spavital.

9. Jerell Adams, Jr., South Carolina: With three touchdown catches in 22 career games, Adams is one of those players who could explode this season. He's got great size (6-6, 247) and more than enough speed to get open and make plays down the field.

10. C.J. Uzomah, Sr., Auburn: He might not be the most productive tight end in the SEC, but he’s one of the most clutch. Uzomah had the game-winning touchdown grab against Mississippi State, and he caught another touchdown in the Iron Bowl. As quarterback Nick Marshall evolves as a passer, Uzomah could see his stock rise.

Five things: Georgia-Auburn

November, 16, 2013
11/16/13
7:00
AM ET


Here are five factors to watch today as No. 25 Georgia visits No. 7 Auburn.

Defending the zone read: You've likely read this week that the No. 1 key for Georgia today is defending Auburn's running game, which leads the SEC and ranks third nationally at 320 yards per game. The centerpiece of that rushing attack is the zone-read run, where quarterback Nick Marshall has the option to hand off or run himself based on what he sees from the defense.

According to ESPN Stats and Information, Auburn leads the SEC in yards (150.5 ypg), touchdowns (17) and 10-yard plays (39) on zone-read runs and has gained at least 100 yards on such plays in six out of the last seven games. Marshall has run 62 times out of his 104 total carries on the zone read and averaged 9.3 yards per attempt -- including 221 yards against Tennessee last week, the most such yards by an AQ player in a game this season.

Georgia's edge players -- outside linebackers Jordan Jenkins and Leonard Floyd and nickelback Josh Harvey-Clemons -- must play a disciplined game along with linebackers Amarlo Herrera and Ramik Wilson in order to defend those plays. The Bulldogs have defended the run well overall, ranking fourth in the SEC with 120.6 yards allowed per game, but they have been erratic at setting the edge -- and that could be an important factor against Auburn.

Bulldogs' returning weapons: Todd Gurley and Michael Bennett have been back for a couple weeks. Now tight end Arthur Lynch and receiver Chris Conley could rejoin them in Georgia's offensive lineup. All of a sudden, Georgia's formerly explosive offense looks a lot more like the group that lit up scoreboards early in the season.

Tailback Gurley isn't back at 100 percent -- how big of a workload he can assume will be one of the biggest keys today -- but quarterback Aaron Murray should have some productive weapons at his disposal. Despite the injuries that have hit his team, Murray still has the sixth-best opponent-adjusted Total QBR (86.7 in the FBS this season and is completing 52.4 percent of his passes of 15 yards or more. The Bulldogs will likely look to strike on the big play today.

Special teams woes: Perhaps the scariest matchup for Georgia is its special teams units against Auburn's. UGA special teams ace Connor Norman said earlier this week that the distinguishing characteristic of Auburn return men Corey Grant and Chris Davis -- both of whom returned kicks for touchdowns last week -- and Tre Mason is their speed and aggressiveness in hitting the hole. Georgia is 13th in the SEC in kickoff coverage (38.1 yards per return), but ranks 18th nationally in punt return defense (4.1). The Bulldogs must also avoid the other special teams meltdowns like blocked punts and bad snaps that have plagued them at points this season.

Defending Auburn offense: The zone-read run is only one element of Auburn's offense that will concern Bulldogs defensive coordinator Todd Grantham. Marshall is an erratic thrower, but he has had success throwing the deep ball to Sammie Coates (26 catches for 648 and 5 TDs), who ranks second nationally with 24.9 yards per catch, and the wheel route to various receivers, including tight end C.J. Uzomah. It all starts with the run, though, as Auburn leads all AQ schools this season in rushing yards before contact (2,097 of its 3,200 yards came before the first hit).

An interesting side note in Georgia's attempt to defend the Tigers is that Harvey-Clemons has actually played the Marshall role in this scheme. He said his coach at Lowndes High School attended a coaching clinic at Auburn and implemented Gus Malzahn's offense with the athletic Harvey-Clemons moonlighting at quarterback in the Wing-T offshoot. The Vikings shied away from using Harvey-Clemons in that position as the season progressed because of the hits he was taking and because the fatigue from playing the position was affecting him on defense. But he said his time executing the offense could be of assistance on defense today as he tries to diagnose what Marshall and company are attempting.

Beat the press: Keep an eye on the Georgia receivers' abilities to get off the line as they run their pass routes. Auburn's defensive backs are known for their aggressive, press-coverage tactics as they try to disrupt wideouts' timing with their quarterbacks and provide an extra second or two for their pass rushers to record a sack. Auburn has enjoyed mixed results in that endeavor. The Tigers are fourth in the SEC with 23 sacks and 11 interceptions, but they're also 11th in the league in pass defense, surrendering 238.8 passing yards per game.

SEC lunchtime links

August, 5, 2013
8/05/13
3:17
PM ET
A little lunchtime reading from around the SEC:

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