Georgia Bulldogs: #AskLoogs

#AskLoogs: UGA stockpiles RBs

January, 11, 2014
Jan 11
12:30
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Well, that would be an easy assumption, and who knows? Their combined production might be comparable at the collegiate level. At least you hope it will be if you are a Georgia fan. However, these two prospects are different types of backs from Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall. Both of them are tall, long gliders and gallopers. Chubb and Michel are much shorter with different body types -- more squatty. Chubb and Michel remind me more of Ronnie Brown and Cadillac Williams. A lower center of gravity, shorter and shiftier with excellent lateral agility. However, these four have many of the same traits. They can all run inside, they can all bounce to the perimeter and turn the corner and they are capable of producing big plays if they get to the second level. Most importantly, when Gurley and Marshall eventually move on, there won’t be a lack of or drop off in talent. They bring much more to the table than Georgia’s current reserves.

#AskLoogs: Impact of South Florida RBs

November, 5, 2013
11/05/13
12:30
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Sony Michel (Plantation, Fla./American Heritage) and Joseph Yearby (Miami/Miami Central) are actually very similar in both style and talent, which is why they are so close in the ESPN 300 rankings. Michel gets the edge with slightly more size and lower-body power, but has also had more of a history of being dinged up, which is a bit concerning.

The reason why these two are so similar is because they look very much alike in how they run the ball — low to the ground with sudden lateral agility and explosive second gears once they get to the second level.

Dalvin Cook (Miami/Miami Central) is a different type of guy, though. The more we study him, the higher ceiling we believe he has. He reminds us of last year’s Dontre Wilson, now at Ohio State. We make this comparison because Cook is such a dynamic athlete that he could easily be recruited as a receiver or corner, which is what makes him so attractive. This gives coaches options with Cook. He possesses just about every desirable trait you look for in a running back, including ball skills.

As to who makes the biggest impact, that is impossible to determine at this point. So much of that answer is dependent upon who makes the right choices in school, scheme and taking advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself. I do honestly feel all three are capable of making an impact, and early. Dare I say we like Yearby more than Duke Johnson coming out? Yes, we do.

#AskLoogs: Georgia can't keep them all

November, 1, 2013
11/01/13
12:30
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It revolves around two things. I believe there is more of a declaration from birth of which team you choose in both Alabama and Louisiana than there is in Georgia. That sounds so simple, but from the moment kids can walk in those states, they pick a side and the allegiance is formed. I’m not so sure that same deep-rooted passion affects childhood in Georgia the way it does in Alabama and Louisiana.

Also, keep in mind that Louisiana has no other BCS program in state to compete with, so generally, all the best are going to stay home. Kids in Alabama have two premier BCS choices. Also, the population in the state of Georgia does not allow for every kid to remain at home, and Georgia Tech isn’t an option for everyone athletically and academically. Georgia has to make tough choices on a lot of kids and can’t take them all, which means they are going to have to leave the state, whether or not they want to.

Georgia has almost 10 million people in its population, compared to 4.8 million in Alabama and 4.6 million in Louisiana. It is a pure numbers game.
Want to ask ESPN RecruitingNation senior analyst Tom Luginbill a question about your team? Tweet it to @TomLuginbill using the hashtag #AskLoogs.



In my opinion, I would likely take Texas on resources and finances alone, but Florida would be a close second and nose to nose with USC.

Florida edges USC slightly because of the player pool available to them in the states that border Florida. USC does not have this luxury with the states that border California.

Texas is perhaps the biggest national brand in sports there is today. From a resources standpoint, they are the only team that could compete with Alabama when it comes to the ability to get things done when needed as a program. Fan base, alumni, booster support, player pool for recruiting, image, branding, etc., are all at a premier level, and this is why if Texas were to make a change that financially if they wanted to, they could get Nick Saban at Alabama to at least listen.

Texas might be down a bit now, but there is not a coach in America, including those at current top-10 programs, who wouldn’t jump at the chance to be the coach at Texas. Yes, Texas is that big.

#AskLoogs: Comparisons to Blazevich

September, 17, 2013
9/17/13
12:30
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With so many hybrid tight end/wide receivers in today’s game, these guys are essentially oversized possession receivers flexed out in the slot, utilized in the backfield as H-backs or movement types and are rarely utilized within the interior or the offensive line. This is the type of player Blazevich is, entering college, which makes him a similar prospect to Oregon’s Colt Lyerla. These are guys that can stretch and stress the seam pressure safeties. They are athletic enough to consistently win matchups against linebackers and even some safeties at times one-on-one.

#AskLoogs: Crafting the perfect QB

August, 8, 2013
8/08/13
12:30
PM ET
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Sure, we’ll give this a try with QB’s in the current 2014 class with the categories below…

Arm strength: Georgia commit Jacob Park (Stratford/Goose Creek, S.C.). This was close, could have put Alabama commit David Cornwell (Norman North/Norman, Okla.) here as well. The ball jumps out of Park's arm with velocity, power and RPMs to drive the ball vertically and into tight spots.

Accuracy: Stanford commit Keller Chryst (Palo Alto/Palo Alto, Calif.). Chryst shows terrific ball placement and timing with the ability to change ball speeds and drop the ball in over coverage to small windows. His ability to anticipate allows him to throw to a spot before the receiver breaks.

Delivery: Purdue commit David Blough. Is is an uncoachable trait, in my opinion, and one that is highly coveted. Blough pops the ball out of his hand with a lightning quick stroke. It is tight, compact and smooth.

Running ability: Florida commit Will Grier. He is a true dual-threat only when needed. If asked to be an integral part of the running game, Grier can really hurt you with his legs and is not a guy you want to let out of the pocket.

Mental toughness: Chryst. This is where his aptitude and upbringing (his uncle is Pitt coach Paul Chryst) come into play. Chryst is mature and capable of handling the ups and downs of the position having grown up around the game in ways few prospects have.

Competitiveness: LSU commit Brandon Harris. This was close; Texas A&M pledge Kyle Allen also fits the bill. Harris wants to be great and is willing to do what it takes to make it happen. He had received limited exposure and offers in the spring, but proved himself on the camp and combine circuit.

Poise: Clemson commit Deshaun Watson. Calm, cool and collected. Watson has a quiet swagger and calming pocket presence that exudes confidence and control. He weathers the peaks and valleys of the game with an even keel.

Instincts: Oklahoma commit Justice Hansen. Hansen and Grier could swap categories here. Hansen is just one of those guys that knows when to pull the trigger and is at his best when improvising and on the move. He has a sixth sense about where pressure is coming from, can evade defenders and keep plays alive instinctively.

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