Florida Gators: Nick Marshall

AUBURN, Ala. -- There wasn’t much fire in the voice of Gus Malzahn as he stood at the podium following Auburn’s first scrimmage of the spring on Saturday. All told, it was a pretty boring scene. No injuries to report. No position changes to speak of. Only one turnover and a handful of big plays. His team had to move indoors because of the threat of rain, but as he said, “It didn’t bother us a bit.”

Watching Malzahn, you got the feeling he wasn’t playing coy. This was the difference a year makes. Last spring was an anxious time for Auburn. There was no quarterback, no depth chart and no sense of expectations. Malzahn and Co. were simply trying to pick up the pieces left behind from the previous staff.

This spring has a much different tone. All one needed to do was look at the long-sleeve, collared shirt Malzahn wore after practice, the one with the SEC championship patch on its left shoulder. The building phase of Malzahn’s tenure is over. The questions are much fewer this year than the last. And with that, the sense of urgency is far more diminished.

“We've got more information now, so we're not as urgent,” Malzahn said. “We pretty much know a lot about the guys returning.”

Not every coach in the SEC is in the same enviable position.

“You've also got to keep in mind next year," Malzahn said. "You want to get your guys as much reps as you can moving forward for next year, because that's what it's all about ... but I would say, probably, for the most part, that we've got guys in the position that we want them to be in."

Not every coach can afford to look ahead this spring. Not every coach has the time.

With that said, let’s take a look at the programs with the most to accomplish this spring, ranking all 14 schools by the length of their to-do list.

Vanderbilt: Any new coaching staff has the most work to do, from determining the roster to installing new schemes on both sides of the ball. Throw in a new starting quarterback and the raid James Franklin put on the recruiting class, and it adds up to an enormously important spring for Derek Mason.

Kentucky: Mark Stoops has done a lot to turn around the culture at Kentucky. In fact, veteran defensive end Alvin Dupree said it feels like more of a football school now. But the fact remains that Stoops has a very young group to deal with, so inexperienced that true freshman Drew Barker is in contention to start at quarterback.

Tennessee: The Vols are facing many of the same challenges in Year 2 under Butch Jones. He has brought in a wealth of talent, including a remarkable 14 early enrollees. Considering the Vols lost all of their starters on both the offensive and defensive lines, there’s a lot of work to do.

Florida: The hot seat knows no reason. All is good in Gator Land right now as a new offense under a new coordinator is installed, injured players -- including starting quarterback Jeff Driskel -- return, and expectations creep upward. But a bad showing in the spring game could change the conversation quickly for Will Muschamp.

Arkansas: There’s nowhere to go but up for Bret Bielema after a 3-9 finish his first year with the program. The good news is he has young playmakers on offense (Hunter Henry, Alex Collins, etc.). The bad news is the quarterback position is unsettled and his defensive coaching staff is almost entirely overhauled from a year ago.

LSU: A depth chart full of question marks is nothing new for Les Miles, who has endured plenty of underclassmen leaving for the NFL before. But missing almost every skill player on offense (Zach Mettenberger, Jeremy Hill, Odell Beckham, Jarvis Landry) hurts. He has to find replacements at several key positions, and we haven’t even gotten into the defense.

Texas A&M: Cedric Ogbuehi can replace Jake Matthews at left tackle. The combination of Ricky Seals-Jones and Speedy Noil can replace Mike Evans at receiver. But who replaces the legend of Johnny Football? Determining a starter under center won’t be easy, but neither will be overhauling a defense that was far and away the worst in the SEC last year.

Georgia: Jeremy Pruitt should breathe some new life into a struggling Georgia defense. Having Hutson Mason to replace Aaron Murray helps as well. But off-the-field problems continue to plague Mark Richt’s program. With stars such as Todd Gurley, the players are there. The pieces just need to come together.

Missouri: After 13 seasons in Columbia, Gary Pinkel knows how to handle the spring. Maty Mauk appears ready to take over for James Franklin at quarterback, and even with the loss of Henry Josey, there are still plenty of weapons on offense. The real challenge will be on defense, where the Tigers must replace six starters, including cornerstones E.J. Gaines, Kony Ealy and Michael Sam.

Alabama: The quarterback position won’t be settled this spring, so we can hold off on that. But still, Nick Saban faces several challenges, including finding two new starters on the offensive line, replacing C.J. Mosley on defense and completely overhauling a secondary that includes Landon Collins and a series of question marks.

Ole Miss: Hugh Freeze has his players. Now he just has to develop them. With emerging stars Robert Nkemdiche, Tony Conner, Laremy Tunsil, Evan Engram and Laquon Treadwell, there’s plenty to build around. Include a veteran starting quarterback in Bo Wallace and there’s a lot to feel good about in Oxford.

Mississippi State: It’s a new day in the state of Mississippi as both state institutions have high expectations this spring. Mississippi State returns a veteran defense, a solid offensive line and a quarterback in Dak Prescott who could turn into a Heisman Trophy contender. A few months after Dan Mullen was on the hot seat, he now appears to be riding high.

Auburn: Losing Tre Mason and Greg Robinson hurts, but outside of those two stars, the roster remains fairly intact. Nick Marshall figures to improve as a passer, the running back corps is well off, and the receivers stand to improve with the addition of D’haquille Williams. The defense should get better as youngsters such as Montravius Adams and Carl Lawson gain experience.

South Carolina: Steve Spurrier would like to remind everyone that Dylan Thompson was the only quarterback in the country to beat Central Florida last season. Sure, Thompson wasn’t the full-time starter last year, but he has plenty of experience and is ready to be the man. Throw in a healthy and eager Mike Davis and an improving set of skill players, and the offense should improve. The defense has some making up to do on the defensive line, but there’s no reason to panic, considering the rotation they used last year.

SEC's lunch links

March, 24, 2014
Mar 24
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The talk around the SEC today is how three teams from the conference -- Florida, Kentucky and Tennesse -- reached the round of 16 in the NCAA men's basketball tournament. And this was supposed to be a down year for the league.

But we're here to discuss football. Let's take a look at what's happening around the league:

Auburn offensive coordinator Rhett Lashlee says Tigers quarterback Nick Marshall is talented enough to play the position in the NFL.

LSU linebacker Kendell Beckwith is relishing his new role after playing defensive end as a freshman.

Now healthy, quarterback Brandon Allen is preparing for a position battle at Arkansas.

Georgia receiver Malcolm Mitchell -- attempting to return from a torn ACL from last season -- suffered another injury last week, although the Bulldogs' medical staff says he'll be back in time for August practices.

South Carolina offensive lineman Na'Ty Rodgers could face suspension after his alcohol-related arrest from early Sunday.

The defense had the edge in Vanderbilt's spring scrimmage on Saturday.

Alabama's players like what new offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin is teaching thus far.

Jeff Driskel looked sharp working with the first-team offense in Florida's practice on Saturday, according to the Gainesville Sun's Robbie Andreu.

With Missouri's team on spring break, here is a spring practice reset from the Columbia Daily Tribune.

Ultimate 300: SEC's top classes 

January, 30, 2014
Jan 30
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video
The SEC has dominated the recruiting world over the past several years. Since 2008, the SEC has had at least three schools finish in the top 10 of the ESPN recruiting class rankings each year. Last year, the conference had an impressive six schools ranked among the top 10 recruiting classes in the country. This year is much of the same, as seven SEC schools are ranked in the top 10.

Here’s a closer look at the five best recruiting SEC schools in the Ultimate ESPN 300.


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GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- It's not easy watching your arch-rival reach the highest of highs while your team suffers through the lowest of lows, but that's exactly what's happening in Florida. FSU won a national championship to cap a season in which UF posted a losing record for the first time in more than 30 years.

Talk about a programs going in opposite directions. It's not easy to even comprehend the mountain top when you're sitting at rock bottom.

But Florida can learn a lot from this year's champion and runner-up -- Florida State and Auburn.

Tigers bounce back

Auburn might have benefited from a miracle or two, but there is no doubting the way this program rebounded in one year.

[+] EnlargeJeff Driskel
AP Photo/John RaouxJeff Driskel, once the nation's No. 1 QB prospect, gives the Gators -- and new offensive coordinator Kurt Roper -- someone to build the offense around.
That should give everyone associated with Florida great hope. Auburn had a far worse season in 2012 than Florida did in 2013. The Tigers didn't win a single game in the SEC and were just seconds away from winning a national championship one year later.

Gus Malzahn's return brought a sense of connection to Auburn's success in 2010 when he was offensive coordinator. He was able to salvage a recruiting class that ranked No. 11 last February and featured a couple of recruits who were critical to the turnaround.

Defensive end Carl Lawson, the nation's No. 2 overall prospect in the Class of 2013, became a bookend to senior Dee Ford. But it was juco transfer Nick Marshall who made the biggest impact. His electric speed and ability to run Malzahn's offense made the Tigers nearly unstoppable.

Like Auburn a year ago, Florida must use its sub-standard season as a selling point to recruits. The message is simple: "You're needed here and you can play right away."

UF didn't change head coaches, but a new offensive coordinator is nearly as seismic. Kurt Roper, a veteran play-caller with an extensive SEC résumé, will install something very different from the unimaginative, clock-chewing, run-run-pass offense that so frustrated Gator fans the last three seasons.

There's much work to be done across the board, but like Auburn, the key to revamping the offense for Roper and Florida is to work from the quarterback position out.

Seminoles' ascension

Just over a year ago, Florida went to Tallahassee and beat the Seminoles. FSU hasn't lost since.

The difference? A transcendent quarterback.

Sure, Jameis Winston is a generational talent. He's a quarterback prodigy with the otherworldly talent to win both the Heisman Trophy and the national title in just his second year out of high school.

Florida doesn't have that kind of QB, but Jeff Driskel was once the nation's No. 1 quarterback prospect, just like Winston. And UF's incoming freshman Will Grier is rated No. 2 in the nation. Together, Driskel and Grier give the Gators a focal point from which to build around.

Florida State's success came as a result of a steady buildup of talent. Remember how many times fans and observers claimed the Noles were officially "back" in recent years? Now there is no questioning FSU.

If Florida is to return to college football's elite, it needs stability. Some fans might not love the idea of Will Muschamp sticking around, but he is being given the chance to finish what he has started. Florida has recruited some of the nation's best classes -- 12th, fourth and second -- in Muschamp's three years. The talent level is rising, and someone has to steer the ship.

Some people forget this, but Jimbo Fisher has only been a head coach for one more year than Muschamp. And while his run at FSU has seen the Seminoles steadily climb back to prominence, Fisher was there from 2007-09 as offensive coordinator and head-coach-in-waiting when the Noles lost 16 games.

Florida's time with Muschamp has been more like a roller-coaster ride. After free-falling to the bottom, there is but one direction to go.

SEC lunchtime links

December, 27, 2013
12/27/13
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The weekend is fast approaching and bowl game action is beginning to heat up. Here are some headlines from around the league today to sink your teeth into:

Ten SEC surprise players in 2013

December, 20, 2013
12/20/13
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Today, we're looking at 10 players who surprised us in the SEC.

These are players who didn't enter the season with a ton of hype, weren't big-time recruits in the 2013 recruiting class or made big splashes after pedestrian 2012 seasons.

There were a lot of names that could have made it onto this list, but we put our SEC brains together and came up with these 10:

1. Serderius Bryant, LB, Ole Miss: Heading into the season, Bryant was listed as a reserve behind Denzel Nkemdiche. But after Nkemdiche injured his knee in the season opener, Bryant went on a tear for the Rebels. He started nine games and is tied for the team lead with 70 tackles, leads the Rebels with 10.5 tackles for loss and is second with three sacks.

[+] EnlargeSammie Coates
Kevin C. Cox/Getty ImagesSammie Coates emerged as a playmaker in Auburn's high-scoring offense.
2. Sammie Coates, WR, Auburn: Before the season, no one was quite sure who would be catching the brunt of passes in Auburn's offense. Well, Coates took the lead and went from six catches in 2012 to a team-high 38 with 841 yards and seven touchdowns. The Tigers didn't throw a lot, but when they did, Coates was usually the top target.

3. Mike Davis, RB, South Carolina: Everyone knew he was going to be the guy to replace Marcus Lattimore, but Davis looked like a seasoned veteran on the field this season, rushing for 1,134 and 11 touchdowns. He was also very good in the passing game, catching 32 passes for 342 yards.

4. Leonard Floyd, LB, Georgia: Fellow linebacker Jordan Jenkins was supposed to be the star on defense, but Floyd looked like the Bulldogs' best pass rusher at times. The former prep schooler led Georgia with 6.5 sacks and finished the year with 8.5 tackles for loss and 47 total tackles.

5. Markus Golden, DT, Missouri: After registering just 10 tackles last season, Golden was one of the Tigers' most active defensive players. He got tons of push up the middle and was second on the team with 13 tackles for loss and had 6.5 sacks. He also took an interception 70 yards for a touchdown.

6. Nick Marshall, QB, Auburn: The former Georgia defensive back was one of the nation's biggest surprises. He wasn't asked to do a lot with his arm, but made some big-time throws and got more comfortable with his arm as the season went on. Marshall passed for 1,759 yards and 12 touchdowns, but did most of his damage with that deadly read option, rushing for 1,023 yards and 11 more scores on his way to leading Auburn to the VIZIO BCS National Championship Game.

[+] EnlargeSolomon Patton
AP Photo/John RaouxWR Solomon Patton was one of the few bright spots in a down year for the Florida offense.
7. Solomon Patton, WR, Florida: Like Auburn, no one knew who would be the top pass catcher in Gainesville. But after spending most of his career as a role player and more of a gimmick guy, Patton was Florida's most dangerous receiver and the go-to guy for whichever quarterback lined up under center. He was a big-play threat and finished the season leading the Gators with 44 catches, 556 receiving yards and six touchdowns. He also registered 642 yards and a touchdown on kick returns.

8. Dak Prescott, QB, Mississippi State: In a year in which the Bulldogs spent a lot of time rotating guys in at the quarterback spot, Prescott came up big when he was in. A reserve in 2012, Prescott led Mississippi State with 1,657 passing yards and seven touchdowns. Where Prescott really did his damage was on the ground, where he bullied his way to 751 yards and 11 touchdowns.

9. Greg Robinson, OT, Auburn: Last year, Robinson started in 11 games last year, but he exploded in 2013. Helping to protect the nation's best running game, he pushed his way to being an All-American, All-SEC member and someone who could be an early pick in the 2014 NFL draft if he decides to leave school.

10. Michael Sam, DE, Missouri: He was easily the biggest surprise of the league for most of the season. A year after starting nine games and recording 3.5 sacks, Sam took the SEC by storm with 10.5 sacks and 18 tackles for loss. Both led the SEC. The consensus All-American was named the Associated Press' SEC Defensive Player of the Year and was a finalist for both the Bronko Nagurski Trophy and Rotary Lombardi Award.

SEC 2013 wrap

December, 16, 2013
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That cliche about history and its thirst for repeating itself really fits the SEC. Eight years after the SEC captured the first of seven straight BCS national titles, and 16 years after taking the first BCS title, it's closing out the BCS era with one final appearance in the big game.

The league needed a fresh face at a historic place and a little bit of luck to take its talents out west, but it only made sense that the conference that already owns nine BCS titles gets one last shot at another.

[+] EnlargeChris Davis
AP Photo/Dave MartinChris Davis' TD return against Alabama will live forever in SEC lore.
The team with the opportunity to bring commissioner Mike Slive another one of those shiny crystal footballs is Auburn. A three-win SEC bottom-feeder a year ago, the Tigers made the biggest turnaround in college football with an SEC title, 12 wins and some fantastic finishes that play on a loop in the minds of college football fans everywhere.

Auburn didn't have a smothering defense, but it pounded just about every team it faced with the nation's most dangerous rushing attack (335.7 yards per game). Led by Heisman Trophy finalist Tre Mason (1,621 yards and 22 touchdowns), the Tigers' rushing attack, which features elements of the spread, triple option and power running, crossed the 200-yard mark in 12 games.

Along the way, the Tigers had thrilling endings in wins against Texas A&M, Georgia and Alabama. The final two showcased a destined Hail Mary from quarterback Nick Marshall against Georgia and an unthinkable last-second, 109-yard touchdown return by Chris Davis on a missed 57-yard field goal attempt by Alabama.

With Auburn in the big game, that means that for the first time since Auburn was last in this game in 2010, Alabama will be watching from home. The Crimson Tide, which will be haunted by Davis' return for the foreseeable future, is headed to the Allstate Sugar Bowl and isn't competing for its third straight national championship.

The Tide seemed to have everything going for them until Davis took a chance. It bested Johnny Football in a shootout and topped LSU in dominating fashion late. But even Nick Saban and the Tide aren't perfect. A last-second decision to attempt a 57-yard field goal changed everything.

But in a year that was so un-SEC for the conference, it was fitting that Alabama missed the big one. Defenses were hard to come by, with only four teams giving up less than 350 yards a game. Only Alabama allowed less than 20 points per game (11.3).

Quarterbacks changed the dynamic of the conference with more shootouts than smashmouth games. Johnny Manziel passed (3,732 yards and 33 touchdowns) his way to New York for the Heisman ceremony, while we said somber goodbyes to Aaron Murray, AJ McCarron, Connor Shaw (still the toughest man in the game) and Zach Mettenberger.

Traditional SEC Eastern Division powers Florida and Georgia stumbled thanks to injuries. The Gators were hit the hardest and fell the most, suffering their first losing season since 1979, missing out on a bowl game for the first time in 22 years and losing to Vanderbilt and FCS Georgia Southern at home.

Then there was Missouri, which took the SEC East by storm in another bounce-back year. Headed by a high-flying offense, these Tigers won 11 and made it to Atlanta in their second year in the league, only to meet the buzz saw that is Auburn's running game.

Many things were different all around the league this year, but one thing remained the same: A chance at a national championship is still there. Once again, this league needed luck, but somehow the SEC found a way.

Offensive MVP: Tre Mason, RB, Auburn: Mason was one of the league's most consistent players. He led the SEC with 1,621 rushing yards and 22 touchdowns. He set an Auburn record with 23 total touchdowns and 2,137 all-purpose yards. In SEC games, Mason averaged 5.7 yards per carry and crossed the century mark on the ground eight times.

[+] EnlargeVernon Hargreaves III, Michael Bennett
Kim Klement/USA TODAY SportsFlorida CB Vernon Hargreaves III put together an sterling freshman season with three interceptions and 14 passes defensed.
Defensive MVP: C.J. Mosley, LB, Alabama: Missouri defensive end Michael Sam is a close second here, but he just wasn't as consistent as Mosley, who led Alabama with 102 tackles, including 56 solo stops. Mosley was the closest thing to a quarterback on defense that you could find in the country. He can play both the run and pass. He led Alabama with nine tackles for loss and eight quarterback hurries.

Newcomer of the year: With Auburn quarterback Nick Marshall spending a year at Georgia, he wasn't eligible. But our top newcomer came in and made an immediate impact in Florida's secondary. Vernon Hargreaves III started the final 10 games of the season, tying for first in the SEC with 14 passes defended (most by a freshman in Florida history). He also had three interceptions and 38 tackles.

Best game: There were so many to choose from this year. You had instant classics with Vanderbilt-Ole Miss, Georgia-LSU, Auburn-Texas A&M, Alabama-Texas A&M, Missouri-South Carolina and Auburn-Georgia. But Alabama-Auburn had the craziest ending of all. In a game that should have gone to overtime, Davis ended things with a remarkable return to give Auburn a 34-28 win over the top-ranked Crimson Tide. Fans stormed the field, and the Tigers eventually found a spot in the BCS title game.

Biggest disappointment: Yes, injuries ravaged the Gators, but a 4-8 record shouldn't happen at a program like Florida. The most embarrassing part about the year was that home loss to Georgia Southern before getting blown out by Florida State. The Gators scored more than 20 points just four times, and offensive coordinator Brent Pease and offensive line coach Tim Davis were both fired at the end of the season.

Biggest surprise: Auburn went from winning just three games a year ago to playing in the national championship in Malzahn's first season. The Tigers ranked last in the SEC in total offense last year (305) and head into bowl season ranking second (505.3) in the SEC.

SEC Week 14 primer

November, 30, 2013
11/30/13
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Finally, a full slate of SEC games after a couple of weeks of scattered byes and FCS opponents. And what a slate it is.

Seven games remain after Thursday's Egg Bowl and Friday's Arkansas-LSU game, none bigger than No. 1 Alabama at No. 4 Auburn in the annual Iron Bowl. One of the best rivalries in college football has a lot more juice this year, as it's only the second time Alabama and Auburn will play when both are ranked in the top 5 of the AP Poll.

[+] EnlargeNick Marshall, Gus Malzahn
Thomas B. Shea/Getty ImagesCan Gus Malzahn and Nick Marshall lead Auburn past No. 1 Alabama?
Hundreds of RVs started arriving on the Plains last week in anticipation of today's battle for SEC West supremacy and the right to represent the division in Atlanta for the SEC championship game next week. Coming off a bye week, the Tigers have a chance to cap their remarkable turnaround season with an upset many thought improbable before the season began.

And while it might be a victory for AU to simply be in a game of this magnitude after going Oh-for-the-SEC last season, try telling Gus Malzahn or QB Nick Marshall to settle for a consolation prize. Alabama's Nick Saban and QB AJ McCarron, on the other hand, look to extend their already loaded legacies with another shot at postseason glory.

The next biggest game on today's slate will decide who represents the SEC East in Atlanta, as Missouri plays host to Texas A&M. These Tigers have a turnaround season of their own brewing, having gone 5-7 with a 2-6 conference record in their first shot at the SEC last year. What better way to complete the 180 and win a division crown than to face the team they came into the SEC with last season?

When the two met for the first time as SEC foes last year in College Station, Texas, Johnny Manziel was 32-of-44 passing for 372 yards and three TDs while running for 67 yards and two more scores. The Aggies cruised in a 59-29 romp that sealed Manziel's Heisman Trophy résumé. This season, Johnny Football is again vying for the Heisman, but he's coming off the worst loss of his career and coach Kevin Sumlin's brief tenure at A&M. The Aggies will have to prove they haven't lost their edge as this season's goals have dwindled. Mizzou, on the other hand, expects to be on a high with a sold-out, black-out-attired crowd urging on what would be one of the biggest wins in school history.

Waiting in the wings for Missouri to falter is South Carolina, which plays at home in its annual game against in-state rival Clemson. This Palmetto State showdown is a star-studded affair that features two top-10 teams, but the recent history is lopsided in the Gamecocks' favor. Clemson's record-breaking senior QB Tajh Boyd has never beaten South Carolina and will have to shake off the nightmares of last season's game when Gamecocks defensive end Jadeveon Clowney set USC's school record for sacks in a game with 4.5. The Gamecocks have a chance to do something they've never done before in a series that began in 1896 -- win five games in a row.

Another SEC-ACC showdown looks far less competitive down in the Sunshine State, where sad-sack Florida has the daunting task of trying to end its epic six-game losing streak against the powerhouse No. 2 team in the nation, Florida State. Aside from an unbeaten season, the prospect of a BCS championship game berth and a Heisman Trophy for redshirt freshman sensation Jameis Winston on the line, the Seminoles have a score to settle after last season's 37-26 collapse against the Gators in Tallahassee. Always one of the more physical and intense rivalry games in the nation, Florida-Florida State this year feels more like a mismatch, as the Gators have suffered enough injuries and humiliation to last decades.

The other two SEC-ACC games are also somewhat subdued by recent events, as Georgia visits Georgia Tech and Vanderbilt plays host to Wake Forest. The Bulldogs are still reeling from the loss of star quarterback Aaron Murray, who suffered a torn ACL last week. He will be replaced by Hutson Mason, a fourth-year junior who has the confidence of his coaches and teammates. The taller task for Georgia today will be stopping the Yellow Jackets' triple-option attack.

After beating three straight SEC East foes, Vanderbilt and coach James Franklin have already made history with a third consecutive season that will culminate in a bowl appearance. Facing the Demon Deacons simply provides another opportunity to extend an amazing streak of wins in the month of November. The Commodores haven't lost in November since 2011 and haven't lost to Wake since 2010, before Franklin arrived.

Rounding out the conference schedule is UK's annual tilt with Tennessee, two of the league's bottom-three teams. Had they upset Vanderbilt last week, Butch Jones' Vols could have been playing for a feel-good bowl berth, but the Dores pulled out a last-second comeback and ripped UT's heart out on a fake jump-pass quarterback keeper. Mark Stoops' Wildcats, on the other hand, would be thrilled with any kind of SEC win. Kentucky is 0-7 this season after going winless in league play last year and hasn't won a conference game in its last 15 tries.

  • Florida State at Florida, noon ET, ESPN
  • Wake Forest at Vanderbilt, 12:21 p.m. ET, SEC TV
  • Alabama at Auburn, 3:30 p.m., CBS
  • Georgia at Georgia Tech, 3:30 p.m., ABC
  • Clemson at South Carolina, 7 p.m. ET, ESPN2
  • Tennessee at Kentucky, 7 p.m. ET, ESPNU
  • Texas A&M at Missouri, 7:45 p.m. ET, ESPN

SEC lunchtime links

November, 18, 2013
11/18/13
12:00
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Another wild weekend of SEC football is in the books. Let's take a look at what's being talked about around the league on Monday:

SEC Power Rankings: Week 12

November, 18, 2013
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It looks like No. 1 and No. 2 in our Power Rankings are in for quite the game in their regular-season finale. As for the rest of the lineup, we had a little more movement after a pretty entertaining weekend:

1. Alabama (10-0, 7-0 SEC; last week: 1): All title contenders slack. For some reason, it's in their DNA. A week after thumping LSU by 21, Alabama received quite the gut check with a lethargic 20-7 win over Mississippi State. The Crimson Tide mustered just 383 total yards and turned it over four times, but a win is a win at this point. A nice tuneup against Chattanooga is all that remains before what should be an epic bout in the Iron Bowl.

2. Auburn (10-1, 6-1 SEC; LW: 2): Whatever cliche you want to give Saturday's thrilling 43-38 win over Georgia, go for it because it deserved it. The Tigers tried to hand Georgia a comeback win, but Nick Marshall's prayer of a throw had other plans. Say what you will about Auburn's sloppy fourth quarter, this team heads into the bye week with a ton of momentum and in the BCS picture. It must be nice to rest before playing Alabama.

3. Missouri (9-1, 5-1 SEC; LW: 3): The Tigers were off over the weekend, which means quarterback James Franklin had another week to rest his shoulder before heading to the Grove on Saturday. So much is still in front of this team, and the pressure is on. With South Carolina beating Florida, Mizzou has to win out to claim the SEC Eastern Division.

4. Texas A&M (8-2, 4-2 SEC; LW: 4): The Aggies were also on a bye, which will probably do A&M some good with a trip to LSU on Saturday. Last year, LSU's defense suffocated Johnny Manziel for most of the day in the Tigers' 24-19 win. But neither Manziel nor Kevin Sumlin has lost a road game during their two seasons of work with the Aggies. Tiger Stadium won't intimidate either one.

5. South Carolina (8-2, 6-2 SEC; LW: 5): The Gamecocks certainly made things interesting in their ugly 19-14 win over Florida, but now they are a Mizzou loss away from winning the SEC East for just the second time. It has been an interesting season for South Carolina, but the Gamecocks seem to be hitting their stride and have a chance for a top-10 matchup with Clemson at the end of the season that could be for a BCS bowl game.

6. Ole Miss (7-3, 3-3 SEC; LW: 7): After losing three straight SEC games, the Rebels have now reeled off four wins in a row and are fresh off a 51-21 win over Troy. Quarterback Bo Wallace has been extremely impressive during the Rebels' run, averaging 305 yards with eight touchdowns to two interceptions. Things will be absolutely rocking in Oxford with No. 8 Mizzou heading in for what should be an electrifying night game.

7. LSU (7-3, 3-3; LW: 8): After a deflating loss to Alabama, the Tigers got a chance to rest this weekend. You have to wonder how this team is doing mentally. This year has been the season of mistakes and what-ifs for LSU, and the Tigers can't afford another sloppy performance with Johnny Football coming to town.

8. Vanderbilt (6-4, 3-4 SEC; LW: 9): Just like last year, the Commodores are making another impressive run in November. Last year, Vandy went 4-0 and could be on its way to doing that again. The Commodores weren't dominant in their 22-6 win over Kentucky, but they became bowl eligible for a school-record third straight year and created history with wins over Florida and Georgia this season.

9.Georgia (6-4, 4-3 SEC; LW: 6): It has been a really ugly season for the Bulldogs. Everything in 2013 for the Dawgs can be summed up in the split second it took for Josh Harvey-Clemons to deflect Marshall's last-ditch-effort pass up and into the hands of Ricardo Louis for a touchdown that ripped the Bulldogs' hearts from their chests. Injuries and rookie mistakes have cost the Bulldogs a chance at a third consecutive SEC East title.

10. Florida (4-6, 3-5 SEC; LW: 10): What did you really expect from Florida on Saturday? The Gators, who have dealt with a rash of season-ending injuries, were down to their third-string quarterback in a hostile South Carolina environment. This team didn't quit and had a pretty good game plan until things fell apart in the fourth quarter. For the second time in three years, Florida will finish the year with at least six losses.

11. Tennessee (4-6, 1-5 SEC; LW: 11): With Vandy and Kentucky remaining, the Vols are in must-win mode against the Commodores on Saturday. Last year, the Dores ran the Vols out of Nashville with a 41-18 blowout and enter this game on an absolute roll. It has been a tough first year for Butch Jones, but the Vols are coming off of a bye week and have their backs against the wall.

12. Mississippi State (4-6, 1-5 SEC; LW: 12): Even though the Bulldogs lost at home to Alabama over the weekend, their fans cheered them on after the game. A 13-point loss is rarely applauded, but Mississippi State stayed tough against No. 1 Alabama. Still, the Bulldogs now have to win out in order to become bowl eligible for the fourth straight year, and that won't be easy with Ole Miss still on the schedule.

13. Arkansas (3-7, 0-6 SEC; LW: 13): The Hogs were off over the weekend, and you have to hope that the extra time was used to get that passing game going. It's clear that Bret Bielema has been behind the eight ball when it comes to having the types of players he needs for his system. As a result, Arkansas is last in the SEC in passing (149 yards per game) and is riding a seven-game losing streak.

14. Kentucky (2-7, 0-6 SEC; LW: 14): You have to give the Wildcats credit: Despite their record, they haven't quit. That 22-6 loss to Vanderbilt marked the 14th straight SEC loss for Kentucky and the third straight loss to the Commodores. The offense's inconsistency just keeps holding this team back, as the Cats scored on an early 75-yard drive but failed to score again, registering just 262 total yards.

What we learned in the SEC: Week 12

November, 17, 2013
11/17/13
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Wow. What a Saturday. How do you top that?

Fortunately, there are still things to be decided and big games remaining in the SEC. But in the meantime, let's look back at the storylines and what we learned in the league from Saturday’s action:

Just when you think you've seen it all ... guess again. The ending to Auburn versus Georgia will be talked about for a long time to come. People still talk about the "Bluegrass Miracle" when Devery Henderson caught a game-winning 74-yard touchdown pass from Marcus Randall to help LSU stun Kentucky with no time remaining back in 2002, but the "Miracle on the Plains" had a similar feel, only with much higher stakes. Auburn still has a chance at an SEC title if it can win out; Georgia was still holding out hope it could find its way into a tie for the SEC East title. But Nick Marshall's desperation heave on fourth-and-18 wound up bouncing off a Georgia defender (two had a shot to intercept it or knock it down) and into the hands of Ricardo Louis, who walked in for the improbable game-winning score. This really is a dream season for Auburn, considering where the Tigers were at this time a year ago.

[+] EnlargeAJ McCarron
AP Photo/Butch DillIt wasn't always pretty, but AJ McCarron and Alabama did enough to win against Mississippi State.
Alabama can win when not at its best: Saturday was a big-time gut check for the No. 1 Crimson Tide. After their destruction of LSU last week, it seemed all but a formality that they would walk into the BCS title game, but Mississippi State gave them all they could handle. Championship teams have to deal with that and have to win when they're not performing at peak level. That's what happened to Alabama, which got it done, on the road.

It wasn't pretty, but a win's a win for SC: Considering how beaten up Florida is, it's easy to say that South Carolina should have cruised by the Gators. The Gamecocks didn't, having to squeak out a 19-14 victory, but it doesn't matter, because they've done all they can do to this point. Their conference schedule is wrapped (the Gamecocks are 6-2) and all they can do is sit and wait to see if Missouri wins out and clinches the division, or falters and drops a game. The loss Georgia suffered means South Carolina doesn't have to worry about the Bulldogs, and if Mizzou loses, the Gamecocks head to the SEC title game.

Vanderbilt's pretty good in November: At least under James Franklin, that is. The Commodores took care of business against Kentucky, winning 22-6 to make them bowl eligible for the third straight year. Pre-Franklin, Vanderbilt appeared in just four bowl games. Since Franklin took over, Vanderbilt is 8-2 in November and has won seven straight in the month dating back to 2011. The Commodores are hoping to finish like they did last season, when they won five consecutive games. A bonus for the Commodores: Quarterback Austyn Carta-Samuels returned from injury and went 19-of-24 for 184 yards while wearing a brace on his left knee.

It's going to be a fun finish: Who knew Auburn would be playing for something come the Iron Bowl? Nobody had Missouri winning the SEC East, which the Tigers have a chance to do. There are players in the conference still gunning for the Heisman Trophy, namely Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel, who has a date with LSU waiting (and one at Mizzou after that). No matter what you do, hold on to your hats because it could be a wild finish in these last few weeks, if Saturday was any indication.

SEC Week 12 primer

November, 16, 2013
11/16/13
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Alabama-LSU was the centerpiece of last week's SEC slate, and while this week won't generate nearly the same national attention, the highlight game on the schedule is brimming with intrigue and significance.

No. 25 Georgia (6-3, 4-2 SEC) travels to No. 7 Auburn (9-1, 5-1). Under first-year coach Gus Malzahn, the Tigers have risen like a phoenix from the ashes of last year's winless SEC ordeal. Auburn QB Nick Marshall is at the center of it all.

Coming off an SEC player of the week performance with 214 yards rushing in a win at Tennessee, the junior will take aim at an improving but still suspect Georgia defense. Marshall, a juco transfer, originally enrolled at Georgia coming out of Wilcox County High School in Rochelle, Ga. He was a prolific quarterback and a terrific athlete in high school but was recruited to play cornerback. After one season and five tackles, Marshall was dismissed for violating team rules. He'll lead a pack of hungry Tigers, who can represent the SEC West in Atlanta if they win out.

Georgia is still clinging to some title-game hopes of its own, but far more pressing for the Bulldogs is getting back on track with healthy players. Running back Todd Gurley and wide receiver Michael Bennett will each play in a third straight game, allowing offensive coordinator Mike Bobo the luxury of a balanced offense. If record-breaking quarterback Aaron Murray can make today's game into a track meet, the last team with the ball could be the winner.

No. 10 South Carolina (7-2, 5-2) will look to wrap up its conference slate at home with a win against injury-plagued Florida (4-5, 3-4). The Gamecocks are just a half-game behind idle Missouri, which still must play at Ole Miss and at home against Texas A&M. The East race does not appear to be over, however, it is strange not to see the Gators involved in the chase for the division crown. Florida has played in a league-high 10 of the 21 SEC championship games. In the Gamecocks, the Gators today play their third straight opponent coming off a bye week. UF lost the previous two to Georgia and Vanderbilt, falling under .500 for the first time since 1992.

The other night game to watch (at least early on), features an hour-and-a-half bus trip for the No. 1-ranked Crimson Tide. Alabama (9-0, 6-0) takes on Mississippi State (4-5, 1-4) in another game that could showcase senior quarterback AJ McCarron, who has the Tide offense absolutely humming since a 25-0 win vs. Ole Miss. Want a stat geek's sense of how well McCarron has been in his last five games (all wins by 21 points or more, by the way)? Since Oct. 1, he's completing 72.7 percent of his third-down passes, which is second in the nation behind Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel. And his 96.3 third-down Total QBR in that span ranks fifth in the FBS. The Tide have been rolling, and the big prizes are starting to come into focus. Dan Mullen and the Bulldogs can expect more of the same.

Two early games today offer a chance to catch some rising stars. Ole Miss (6-3, 3-3) plays host to Troy (5-5). The Rebels are looking for a fourth straight win after quarterback Bo Wallace threw for 407 yards and three touchdowns last week in a 34-24 win against Arkansas. Head coach Hugh Freeze's uptempo offense is gathering steam in Oxford, Miss.

Another coach on the rise is James Franklin, who can what was once unthinkable with a win today -- get Vanderbilt into its third bowl game in a row. The Commodores won their last seven games last year (including a win in the Music City Bowl) and have picked up where they left of in terms of late-season success. Vandy won its sixth consecutive November game last Saturday, shocking Florida in the Swamp. Before Franklin took over, VU had lost nine November games in a row. The Commodores (5-4, 2-4) welcome Kentucky (2-7, 0-5), which has struggled mightily under first-year coach Mark Stoops. The Wildcats have beaten just one FBS team -- Miami (Ohio) in Week 2.

Here’s the rundown of today's games:
  • Troy at Ole Miss, noon ET, ESPNU
  • Kentucky at Vanderbilt, 12:21 p.m. ET, SEC TV
  • Georgia at Auburn, 3:30 p.m. ET, CBS
  • Florida at South Carolina, 7 p.m. ET, ESPN2
  • Alabama at Mississippi State, 7:45 p.m. ET, ESPN



When Steve Spurrier looks at Saturday's opponent, he tries not to see the past.

South Carolina's head coach tries to temporarily escape his playing and coaching days at Florida, both of which brought him national notoriety. It's just his team against "their team."

But what he really doesn't want to think about is the blunder of a game his Gamecocks had last year in the Swamp. Ranked No. 7 and playing what seemed like an overachieving No. 2 Florida team, South Carolina literally fumbled away any chance of beating a Gators team that registered only 14 first downs and 183 yards of offense, but scored 44 points to South Carolina's 11. The Gators managed 29 yards and two first downs in the first half, but led 21-6 after three South Carolina turnovers, including a Connor Shaw fumble on the game's opening play. South Carolina finished the day with four turnovers.

[+] EnlargeSteve Spurrier, Connor Shaw
Jeff Blake/USA TODAY SportsCoach Steve Spurrier and QB Connor Shaw are looking for a better showing this year against UF.
So while Spurrier tries to block out his past triumphs in orange and blue, he and his team will be seeking some redemption against a team that cost them a chance at a second SEC Eastern Division title. This year, a spot in Atlanta is yet again on the line for the Gamecocks, and a loss to Florida would all but end that hope.

"I don't know if we could have won it, but I think we could have been closer than getting beat by 33 points," Spurrier said. "But that's what happened. ... Hopefully it doesn't happen to us this week."

Hours earlier, another form of redemption will be taking place more than 300 miles away on the Plains. It's Auburn-Georgia, but it's also Nick Marshall vs. Georgia. Auburn's talented quarterback was once a Bulldog but was dismissed in February 2012 for a violation of team rules.

For Marshall, it's a chance to face his old team at a new position and push his squad closer to a potential SEC West title. He signed with Georgia as a defense back but will face the Bulldogs as a quarterback who ranks seventh in the SEC with 734 rushing yards and has 1,301 passing yards. He also has 15 total touchdowns and has helped lead the Tigers to the No. 7 spot in the BCS standings and a 9-1 record.

Marshall left the Bulldogs in a very awkward manner, but it sounds as if there aren't many hard feelings from his former teammates. Junior cornerback Damian Swann said earlier this week that he has no ill feelings toward Marshall and has actually wished him well before a couple of games this season.

"You can't really fault other people for something that has already happened," Swann said. "I don't think we have that here. I think with that situation, Nick learned from it and I think it made him a better person and I think it's making him a better player as everyone can see."

And he has a chance to redeem a team that has been outscored 83-7 in the last two games against the Bulldogs. He also has a chance to derail Georgia's chances at sneaking into the East's top spot. It's a lot to ask a youngster, who will no doubt have a plethora of emotions swirling through his body Saturday, but his coach doesn't seem worried about Marshall's composure.

"He is familiar with them, there is no doubt," Auburn coach Gus Malzahn said. "If he holds true to past experience this year, he doesn't get too high or too low. There isn't too much that rattles him. He stays pretty calm no matter what the moment.

"He's an even-keeled guy, he's motivated and I know that he will be ready."

Like Malzahn expects Marshall to be ready, Spurrier expects a struggling Florida team to come out swinging with its back against the wall. In a way, the Gators are looking for some redemption, too. They're in danger of missing out on a bowl game for the first time in 22 years and could have their first losing season since 1979.

Florida has been ravaged by a handful of injuries and a bumbling offense, but the season isn't over. At least not in Spurrier's eyes, and he doesn't expect to be handed a crucial victory.

"We have a lot to play for and they're trying to win a ball game and get bowl eligible, so they've got a lot to play for," he said. "It should be a heck of a game."

What to watch in the SEC: Week 12

November, 14, 2013
11/14/13
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The season is winding down, but the drama is ratcheting up. Here are 10 things to watch in the SEC this week:

1. Auburn's revenge tour: It's not Alabama-LSU, but this week's marquee matchup does have one of those cool SEC nicknames -- "The Deep South's Oldest Rivalry" -- and a boatload of history. No. 25 Georgia pays a visit to No. 7 Auburn, "The Loveliest Village On The Plains" (there's another one of those nicknames). The rivalry dates back to 1892 with 116 meetings, and it couldn't be more hotly contested. The series is tied 54-54-8. This season, both teams have plenty to play for, as Auburn (9-1, 5-1 in the SEC) controls its destiny in the SEC West, and Georgia (6-3, 4-2) is still alive in the East. But the surprising Tigers clearly have momentum and something to prove to themselves, the SEC and rivals such as Georgia. That's right, this one is personal. Auburn's winless SEC season in 2012 was sealed by embarrassing losses to Georgia (38-0) and Alabama (49-0). The Bulldogs also have won six of the past seven games against Auburn.

[+] EnlargeConnor Shaw
Jeff Vest/Icon SMIConnor Shaw and the Gamecocks hope to keep their SEC East dreams alive with a win over Florida on Saturday.
2. Precursor to the SEC East conclusion: Missouri (9-1, 5-1) is in the driver's seat and is resting up this weekend before a fascinating final stretch that features two of its tougher challenges on the schedule -- at Ole Miss and versus Texas A&M. The Tigers are not to be taken lightly, but those matchups leave open the possibility of South Carolina (7-2, 5-2) or Georgia sneaking into Atlanta if Mizzou slips up. With a win in their final SEC game Saturday night against Florida, the Gamecocks could sit back and root against Missouri. The Bulldogs would be doing much of the same if they upset Auburn on the road and then close out their SEC slate with a win against Kentucky.

3. Style points for Saban? Somehow Alabama's win against LSU last weekend didn't resonate with the college football-viewing public, even though the Tide scored more points (38) than any game in the series since a 41-12 victory in 1947. Oh well, Nick Saban's perpetual pursuit of perfection persists. Perhaps he can convince the the nation's No. 1 team to be on guard for a letdown against Mississippi State, a team Bama has dominated during a five-game winning streak with a combined score of 155-34.

4. Nick Marshall vs. Georgia: Auburn's quarterback stood on the other sideline two seasons ago, as a defensive back, when his Georgia Bulldogs dismantled the Tigers 45-7. That game was in Athens, Ga., about three hours north of Marshall's hometown of Pineview, Ga. After he was dismissed by the Bulldogs for a violation of team rules in February 2012, Marshall went the juco route, became a QB and resurfaced at Auburn. It has been a pretty good move, as Marshall leads SEC quarterbacks with 734 rushing yards and ran for a career-high 214 yards last week, the highest individual rushing total in the conference this season and third all time among Auburn QBs. While Georgia's run defense has improved to fourth in the conference (giving up 126 yards a game), UGA has surrendered 17 rushing touchdowns. The Tigers have to be salivating at the thought of Marshall and the third-best rushing attack in the nation facing his old mates.

5. Sleeping giant could awaken: Speculate all you want about why South Carolina's all-everything defensive end Jadeveon Clowney isn't producing his usual havoc and statistics consistently this season -- teams are running away from him, he's facing double- and triple-teams, he's trying not to get hurt and risk the payday everyone expects in May. Whatever. Clowney doesn't have to worry about any of that against the wounded Florida offensive line Saturday. The Gators have lost three starting offensive tackles this fall and have moved 6-foot-4, 307-pound left guard Max Garcia into Clowney's line of fire at left tackle.

6. Streakin' Dores: Not much can top what Vanderbilt has already achieved this season, beating traditional East powers Georgia and Florida in two of its past three games. But a win against lowly Kentucky on Saturday would qualify the 5-4 Commodores for their third consecutive bowl game. Let's put that into perspective: Before back-to-back bowl appearances in the past two seasons, Vanderbilt had been to four bowl games in 120 years of football. Winning out -- which is certainly possible for a confident team that finishes with UK, Tennessee and Wake Forest -- would give Vandy 23 wins (with a bowl game still to play) in the past three seasons. That would be the best three-year stretch in VU history since Hall of Fame coach Dan McGugin went 24-4-2 from 1926-28.

7. Under-the-radar Rebels: Last week, Ole Miss became the latest team to handle a foundering Arkansas program that is winless in the SEC. It was the Rebels' third straight win, a streak that started with a signature upset of LSU and has given Hugh Freeze's upstart bunch a ton of momentum. The Rebs have been able to shake off the disappointment of three straight losses to three of this fall's SEC West heavyweights -- Alabama, Auburn and Texas A&M. Now Mississippi has a solid chance to finish the season with six straight wins and 9-3 overall record. The task is not implausible, as Ole Miss plays host to Troy on Saturday, welcomes Missouri on Nov. 23 and wraps up its season with the Egg Bowl at Mississippi State on Nov. 28.

8. More pain for MSU? A difficult season could get tougher Saturday, as Mississippi State hosts No. 1 Alabama. The Tide will be the Bulldogs' sixth opponent currently among the top 18 in the AP poll, and the first five meetings didn't go so well. They gave up 85 points in the past two losses to two of the SEC's best offenses in South Carolina and Texas A&M. The Bulldogs did put up a good fight against the Aggies with 21 points in the fourth quarter of a 51-41 loss, but inspirational quarterback Dak Prescott (elbow) is questionable this week.

9. Whither James Franklin? Vanderbilt is no doubt relishing a breakthrough season, but might the Commodores be flying just a bit too close to the sun? Head coach James Franklin already has done what few could envision -- winning and recruiting at a school previously known for raising the collective GPA of the conference. But there could very well be a price for that success, as his name is popping up in early coaching searches. Franklin already has been mentioned as a possible candidate for the USC Trojans job. If you live in Nashville, Tenn., keep an eye on the silly season this December.

10. It's almost over: Five teams have their final bye of the season this weekend. Missouri is resting up to make its final push for an SEC East crown. LSU and Texas A&M are licking various wounds and lamenting the end of their West division hopes. Tennessee is looking to regroup after three straight losses, win its last two games and go to a bowl for the first time since 2010. And Arkansas is simply trying to find a way back into the win column after seven straight losses.

What we learned in the SEC: Week 11

November, 10, 2013
11/10/13
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All eyes were on Saturday's Alabama-LSU showdown, but there were plenty of storylines to take away from the rest of the conference, as well. Here are five things we learned from Week 11 in the SEC.

Alabama still king: For the first 30 minutes, it looked like it was going to be another epic clash between the Tide and the Tigers. However, the nation's No. 1 team imposed its will in the second half and rolled to a 38-17 victory. AJ McCarron threw three touchdown passes; T.J. Yeldon rushed for 133 yards and two scores, and the defense held LSU to 43 yards on the ground, sacking quarterback Zach Mettenberger four times. It was the first challenging game the Tide have played in more than a month, and it proved why they are still the No. 1 team. On a weekend when Oregon suffered its first loss, Alabama not only remained unbeaten but showed why it's the favorite to win a third consecutive national championship.

[+] EnlargeAJ McCarron
AP Photo/Dave MartinWith three touchdown passes against LSU, is AJ McCarron finally hearing some Heisman buzz?
Heisman hopefuls: With another solid performance in a big game, is it time we put McCarron back in the Heisman trophy race? It's safe to say that Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston has emerged as the front-runner after the weekend, but McCarron certainly helped himself against LSU. And don't forget about Johnny Manziel, last year's Heisman winner. The Texas A&M quarterback put up more ridiculous numbers Saturday, throwing for 446 yards and five touchdowns at home against Mississippi State. Manziel is on pace to surpass his numbers from last year, but the Aggies' loss to Alabama early in the season could influence voters. Both McCarron and Manziel have marquee games still left to pad their resumes.

Year of the Tiger: Who would've guessed Auburn and Missouri would be No. 2 and No. 3 in the SEC, chasing down Alabama? Both Tigers teams have had terrific seasons, and they continued Saturday with impressive road wins. Ninth-ranked Auburn went to Tennessee and blew out a Volunteers team that had been dangerous at home. Quarterback Nick Marshall rushed for 214 yards and two scores as the SEC's top-rushing offense put up 444 yards on the ground. Missouri also took care of business against a struggling Kentucky team. Wide receiver Dorial Green-Beckham, a former five-star recruit, caught seven passes for 100 yards and four touchdowns. Both teams should remain in the top 10 when the BCS standings come out Sunday.

Trouble in Gainesville: Florida's season went from bad to worse Saturday. The Gators, who have been decimated by injuries, were on a three-game losing streak but hopeful they could turn it around at home against Vanderbilt. It didn't happen. Despite giving up nearly twice as many yards, the Commodores knocked off Florida 34-17 for their first win in Gainesville since 1945. The Gators turned the ball over four times. What does this mean for head coach Will Muschamp? He should get a pass because of all the injuries, but this is the type of loss that could lead to unemployment. Florida now has to win at South Carolina or at home against Florida State just to reach a bowl game.

Gaining momentum: It seems like a long time since Ole Miss lost those three consecutive games to Alabama, Auburn and Texas A&M. The Rebels have quietly righted the ship, and they have a legitimate chance to win out. On Saturday, they looked impressive in a 34-24 win over Arkansas. Quarterback Bo Wallace finished 26-of-33 and threw for a career-high 407 yards. The win made Ole Miss bowl eligible for the second straight year under coach Hugh Freeze, but this team wants more. They want to finish with nine wins and play in a New Year's Day bowl game. That means the Rebels will have to upset Missouri at home in two weeks and finish the season with a win over Mississippi State in the Egg Bowl. Neither is out of the question.

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