Shotgun snaps a big concern for Florida

April, 9, 2014
Apr 9
10:00
AM ET
GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- Twelve seconds.

That's how long it took for a bad snap on the first play of Super Bowl XLVIII to turn into a safety and set the tone for Seattle's blowout win against Denver.

Florida offensive coordinator Kurt Roper watched that game and said the challenge of snapping the ball is something he is cognizant of as he teaches his shotgun offense to a bunch of Gators who have three years of experience in pro-style offenses.

[+] EnlargeMax Garcia
Joe Robbins/Getty ImagesMax Garcia is trying to adjust to Florida's new offense playing center.
"It doesn't matter what level you're at, you still try to focus on that as much as you possibly can," he said. "And it's a skill. There's a lot going on for that guy up front other than just snapping that football. So you just try to keep getting better at it. That's why right now you don't see us alternating back and forth -- gun and under -- because we're trying to focus in on that. …

"Right now that five-yard snap, it's not easy. There's 300-pounders right over him on the snap of the ball coming off."

Any time a team loses a longtime starter at center, some bumps in the road can be expected.

Florida is experiencing just that this spring after the graduation of Jonotthan Harrison, who manned the position for three seasons.

Senior Max Garcia moved to the center position as the heir apparent. The former Maryland transfer played well in his first season for Florida -- mostly at guard -- and was the only offensive lineman who started every game.

Florida coaches have repeatedly praised Garcia as one of their better linemen, but he's still learning how to snap the ball. In an offense that will operate almost entirely out of the shotgun, that could be a bit of a problem.

Look no further than the comments of head coach Will Muschamp throughout spring practice to see the progression of this concern:

March 11 (before spring practice began): "We're going to look at Max Garcia at center, move him inside. [Cameron] Dillard has been a guy that's come along. Trip Thurman will play both center and guard. We'll move him around. Trip's had a really good offseason."

March 25: "Max has done a nice job making the calls up front. We’ve got to be a little more consistent with snapping the ball, which will come. That’s part of the transition there and we knew it was going to happen."

April 4: "I'm extremely concerned about some snapping issues that continue to occur. I think the first couple of practices and some newness in there, I can kind of get that. After a while we've got to move past that."

April 8 (after UF's second scrimmage): "We still had a couple [bad snaps]. Disappointed. … If we continue to have those we need to look in a different direction. We can't afford to have that anymore."

As the veteran of the group and the only contender with starting experience, Garcia still has an overwhelming edge to win the job. He also has Roper's confidence.

"I mean you always want to get better," Roper said. "I don't want the ball off-center or rolling on the ground. All that has to do with timing in the run game and exchanges and all that.

"But am I happy with the way Max is working and trying? Yeah. And do I think he can do it and be really good at it? I do. I think he's talented."

Thurman, a fourth-year junior, has spent most of the spring at left guard with the starting unit. He emerged as a candidate after the struggles of Garcia and Dillard, a redshirt freshman.

"I've taken snaps at center before we start practice, so I'm getting used to that," Thurman said. "Shotgun snaps are a whole lot different than having someone under center. You've got to have the same snap, every snap whether you're going right or left. So it's difficult, but it's something that we need to get used to with this uptempo offense."

Though it's a growing concern, Muschamp said on Tuesday he's optimistic it can be fixed.

"We feel like we've remedied the issue," he said. "As a snapper you can't break your wrist. That's when you create high snaps, when you start breaking your wrist. A couple of situations we were going on silent count, going off the center’s head and when the center’s head comes up he’s got to snap it. He can’t elevate his pads in those situations.

"You create a limp snap to the quarterback, which is a low snap and hard to deal with, which takes a quarterback’s eyes further off the downfield reads and things he’s got to do, it creates an issue for the entire offense. Improved, but not where it needs to be. One bad snap is one too many."

Just ask the Denver Broncos.

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