Expand replay for the playoffs 

October, 5, 2010
10/05/10
8:14
AM ET

Getty ImagesAlready (and often) umpires meet together and with managers to debate and get calls right; replay would make that current necessity (and time-waster) a thing of the past.
Let's make one thing absolutely clear this morning: I do not believe in any way, shape or form that any umpire is fixing baseball games. We have absolutely no evidence that any umpire is on the take.

But for Major League Baseball, the fight against the mere perception that anyone might be involved in fixing ballgames has been a vigilant effort that began in the aftermath of the 1919 World Series. And that precedent set by then-commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis ultimately resulted in the expulsion of Pete Rose, the man with more hits than anybody in the history of the game. It's a stance and effort that continues today. Anyone employed in the sport fully understands, through spring training seminars and prominently posted rules, that fixing a game is regarded as the single most serious offense there is, worthy of the sport's equivalent to a death penalty. It's a long precedent, and it is largely unquestioned.

But for Major League Baseball, the fight against the mere perception that anyone might be involved in fixing ballgames has been a vigilant effort that began in the aftermath of the 1919 World Series and resulted in the expulsion of the man who had more hits than anybody in the history of the game; it's an effort that continues today. Anyone employed in the sport fully understands, through spring training seminars and prominently posted rules, that fixing a game is regarded as the single most serious offense, worthy of the sport's equivalent to a death penalty.

The battle to protect baseball's integrity is something that commissioners have waged for almost a century, and it is to that end that Bud Selig should implement expanded use of instant replay by the time David Price throws the first pitch in the playoffs on Wednesday afternoon.