ACC: North Carolina State Wolfpack

ACC Week 1 predictions

August, 28, 2014
Aug 28
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Why Clemson will win: Defense. It wins championships, right? It will win this game for the Tigers, who led the nation in tackles for loss last season and return every single major contributor to the group. An improved front seven means better results slowing down Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall, the two players Clemson needs to slow down the most. Rather than the shootout we saw a year ago, the defenses will have a much bigger role this season. Right now, Clemson is better than Georgia there, so I'm calling for the upset.
-- Andrea Adelson

Why Georgia will win: Early-season games against nationally recognized teams have not been kind to Georgia coach Mark Richt over the years (see: Clemson, Oklahoma State, Boise State, South Carolina x 2), so the law of averages says he has to win some, right? Well, there's more than just cosmic balancing in the Bulldogs' favor. While the Tigers made huge gains on defense a season ago, they also allowed an average of 38 points per game against Florida State, Georgia, Ohio State and South Carolina. We're not quite sure what to expect out of new Georgia quarterback Hutson Mason, but the duo of Gurley and Marshall at running back is unmatched anywhere else in the country. Last season's game might have played out differently had Gurley not strained a quad on a 75-yard touchdown run.
-- Jared Shanker

Why Miami will win: Duke Johnson changes everything for the Canes, as he keeps their offense moving and takes plenty of pressure off Brad Kaaya. Likewise, the loss of DeVante Parker takes plenty of punch out of Louisville's offense. A new coach, a new league and a new quarterback create too much uncertainty around a Cardinals team that has the target on its back after embarrassing Miami last time around. -- Matt Fortuna

Why Louisville will win: It's not that I'm supremely confident in this pick, but the Cardinals have a few things going for them. First, it's a marquee game for the program, its first as a member of the ACC. Secondly, while a lot has changed on defense for Louisville, it was the top-ranked rushing D in the country last season, which should help Todd Grantham's crew deal with the dynamic Duke Johnson. Most important, however, at quarterback Miami is starting a true freshman in his first career game on the road in a frenzied atmosphere. It won't be a gimme, but Louisville will pull off the victory. -- David Hale

Upset pick of the week

Why ULM will win: ULM has three advantages: It beat Wake Forest a year ago and is familiar with some of the returning personnel; the WarHawks bring back 14 starters; and they are playing at home. Wake Forest is starting true freshmen at quarterback and center. It's never easy to go on the road and make your first career start, let alone on national television. Factor in all the youth and inexperience for the Deacs, and you see why ULM has the edge. -- Andrea Adelson

More consensus picks: Syracuse over Villanova; Pittsburgh over Delaware; UCLA over Virginia; Georgia Tech over Wofford; NC State over Georgia Southern; Boston College over UMass; Virginia Tech over William & Mary; Duke over Elon; North Carolina over Liberty; Florida State over Oklahoma State
RALEIGH, N.C. -- No one expected Jarvis Byrd to still be here, and so NC State made plans for his jersey.

No. 9 never quite fit Byrd, anyway. He was wearing No. 14 when he won a starting job in the Wolfpack's secondary as a true freshman in 2009, and when he tore his ACL in that season finale, and when he fought his way back twice into the starting lineup -- and twice more, was felled by knee injuries. It was No. 14 he was wearing the previous time he was on a field, writhing in pain, assuming his career was done.

When his unlikely comeback began this spring, Byrd switched to No. 9, but that was short-lived. The number, which once belonged to NC State great Mario Williams, is being retired, so Byrd needed an alternative. Last week, coach Dave Doeren called him with a plan.

Doeren wanted a single player to don the No. 1 jersey this season. It would have a special meaning, he told his players on Monday.

"This guy's been through three ACL surgeries," Doeren told the team, "and he didn't have to come back.

"This guy loves the team.

"This guy has shown commitment from Day 1.

"This guy is unselfish.

"This guy is a leader."

The jersey went to Byrd, who earned it not with his play on the field but his determination off it. The room erupted in cheers.

He hasn't made it back yet, but this was a start.

"That was a big moment," Byrd said. "Something I'll always remember."




One of NC State's top recruits in 2009 out of Pahokee, Florida, Byrd won the starting cornerback job by November. He was wrapping up an impressive rookie campaign when in the third quarter of the season finale against rival North Carolina, he tore his right ACL.

The first knee injury was probably the easiest, because for an optimist like Byrd, who had never been seriously injured, it was easier to find hope in the unknown.

[+] EnlargeJarvis Byrd
AP Photo/Tomasso DeRosaNC State's Jarvis Byrd was granted a sixth year of eligibility because of multiple knee injuries.
The rehab was slower than Byrd expected, but mostly, he remained upbeat. He accepted a redshirt for the 2010 season, with his sights set on a big 2011.

The ACL healed, but Byrd's psyche took longer. As he began his comeback, he was reluctant to make sharp cuts and test the knee. Looking back, that was his big mistake.

"When I had to break on the right [knee], I was scared to do it," Byrd said. "And I was just walking back to the huddle [in a summer 7-on-7 drill] when I tore my left ACL. It just popped."

The second one was the hardest, because Byrd realized how much he had to lose, how far he'd have to go and how long he'd be away from the game he loved. So much of the process of rebuilding the knee was familiar, but his optimism was muted.

"I had doubts about coming back," Byrd said. "But I had a bigger goal and purpose to overcome the second one. I felt like I was doing it for my team the second time around instead of myself. That gave me a new drive to overcome the second injury."

By the start of the 2012 season, he was back on the field, but again, his season ended early after he suffered a thigh injury against Virginia.

Back home, friends and family tried to offer encouragement, but that only hurt more. Byrd's family was struggling financially and visits were rare. He felt alone and thought it might be time to go home to Pahokee. Byrd called a friend who played for Florida Atlantic and asked about transferring, but his teammates at NC State weren't ready to say goodbye.

"I had a great group of friends here and those guys helped me get through it," Byrd said. "Anything I needed, they provided. Without them, I never would've made it."

By the time the 2013 season began, the darkest times seemed a distant memory, and Byrd, who switched from corner to safety, was once again a starter and a key member of first-year coach Doeren's new defensive scheme. Through four games, it looked like Byrd's story might have a happy ending.




On Oct. 5, game day against Wake Forest, the usually exuberant Byrd was down. He had friends on the Demon Deacons' sideline, which should've been enough to make it a big game, but he felt flat.

"I wasn't myself," Byrd said. "The sun was draining my energy, the turf was hot. Then I got a cheap shot on my leg and tore my left ACL again."

That should've been the end for Byrd. He had spent five years at NC State and been named a starter three times but played in just 14 games. He had never finished a season healthy.

Byrd told his family and coaches his career was over and told himself he was out of chances. But deep down, he couldn't believe it.

"I wasn't ready to be done," he said. "I went home and was thinking about it the whole time. I couldn't focus on school, on life in general. I was thinking about football all day long."

He had already gone to his senior banquet and said his goodbyes. He put off starting rehab following knee surgery because there was no rush to get back.

He checked in with teammates, who raved about how much stronger the team looked this season, and Byrd realized he didn't want to miss out. He went to Doeren and asked what it would take to get a sixth year of eligibility -- a rare exception that must be granted by the NCAA.

If Byrd wanted, he could return as a graduate assistant, Doeren said. He could still be around the team, help as a coach.

"But I was still thinking about football," Byrd said.

He applied for an appeal, and this spring, the NCAA accepted. He had one more shot to finish his career healthy. And so the process began again.

There were 5 a.m. wake-up calls to get to rehab and long days in the training room, film room and weight room. And there were plenty of people who wondered why he was doing all this in the first place.

[+] EnlargeDave Doeren
Lance King/Getty ImagesDave Doeren gave Byrd jersey No. 1, a gesture representative of his leadership on the team.
"Some guys back home were like, 'What do you have to prove? [NFL] teams aren't looking at you anymore,' " Byrd said. "But for me, it's bigger than that. I'm not thinking about the NFL. I'm thinking about Jarvis Byrd and NC State and trying to get us back on the right track.

"If I'm able to push these guys and we're able to have a good year, I'll be happy. If I can play a whole season and walk out on senior day with my parents by my side, and I can walk out there healthy -- I've never had a healthy season -- I'm perfectly fine with that. I can live with myself without regrets and say I did what I wanted to do."

Byrd spent the spring game on the sideline, drawing up plays and coaching his younger teammates. But just putting on the jersey again felt good. The reluctance that followed past surgeries evaporated. Now, he had nothing to lose.

"I came back the first time and was cautious. The second time, it was like, 'If I get hurt again I may not have a shot,' " Byrd said. "Now, I don't care. I'm giving it all I've got. I just want to get back out there and play the game like I did when I was 6 years old. I want to play for the love of the game."

The process has been challenging. Byrd knows the pain is around each corner. During camp, his knee would swell after a few straight days of practice and he'd be relegated to the sideline again. During one practice, he turned sharply and heard a pop in his knee. He knew that it was simply scar tissue breaking up, but the fear still overwhelmed him. He has had to learn to fight through that fear.

There are no guarantees this season. Doeren said he's confident Byrd will contribute in some way. Byrd said he may not play the first few weeks, but trainers have told him he'll be full-go by the time ACC play begins at the end of September.

If his only impact this season is occasional special teams work, he said that's OK. If he can win a starting job for the fourth time, that will be even better. If he hurts the knee again and the dream ends without warning -- well, Byrd has been through that before.

"If it doesn't work out, I'll be OK with it. I gave it another shot," he said. "I never stopped going after what I really wanted. If I hadn't gone for that sixth year, I wouldn't have been OK with that. I would've always had that on my mind."

However Byrd's story ends isn't important. His teammates have seen the chapters written, one agonizing step at a time, and no matter what happens this season, that will have been his legacy at NC State. That's his real impact. That's why he'll be wearing No. 1 this season.

"I can live with myself without regrets," Byrd said. "I did what I wanted to do."

ACC morning links

August, 27, 2014
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If the first season is usually when a coach gets the benefit of the doubt, Year 2 is when fans want to see improvement so that by Year 3 the coaching staff's plan is coming to fruition.

The ACC has three second-year coaches, each with differing expectations. Athlon Sports took a look at those coaches and what the 2014 outlook is for each coach's program.

Writer Steven Lassan states Boston College's Steve Addazio exceeded expectations in his inaugural season as BC's coach, and there is little doubt Addazio did a great job getting to a bowl game. Without Andre Williams it will be a challenge to get back to a bowl game, but the first half of the schedule sets up pretty nicely.

A bowl game in 2013 and key returners has Syracuse fans believing Scott Shafer will keep the Orange moving in the right direction. There are only two games on the schedule where the Orange will not be given a great chance to win, so there is an expectation for Syracuse to once again be bowl eligible.

At NC State, Dave Doeren is given a partial pass last season after losing his starting quarterback. While the Wolfpack have a long way to go, Doeren has his quarterback in Jacoby Brissett. There is definitely an expectation the Wolfpack will be better, and they can't be much worse after going winless in the ACC last season. Brissett was a highly regarded quarterback coming out of high school, so there is the potential NC State can surprise some teams this season and pull off an upset or two.

Here's a few more links to help you through the day. Remember, we get FBS football tomorrow!

ACC fearless predictions

August, 26, 2014
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The college football season is finally ready to kick off. No doubt all the time we’ve spent studying depth charts and devouring news will be rendered meaningless by September’s end, but that won’t stop us from making a few bold predictions about what’s to come in 2014. If we get half of them right, we’ll call it a success.

1. Jameis Winston will post better numbers -- but won’t win the Heisman.

Much has been made of the depletion of Winston’s receiving corps, but losing Kelvin Benjamin and Kenny Shaw won’t spell doom for the Florida State QB. In fact, Winston struggled at times last year when getting too greedy down the field, and a renewed emphasis on a shorter passing game could up his numbers. When throwing to RBs or TEs last year, Winston completed 79 percent of his throws and averaged 11.6 yards per attempt, with 11 of his 86 passes going for touchdowns. Add the likelihood he’ll play more fourth quarters this season, and his numbers could well go up in 2014 -- but, of course, winning back-to-back Heisman Trophies is no easy task, and neither Winston nor coach Jimbo Fisher has ever shown much interest in chasing individual awards.

[+] EnlargeWill Gardner
AP Photo/Garry JonesUnder coach Bobby Petrino, Will Gardner has a chance to flourish as Louisville's starting QB.
2. Louisville’s Will Gardner will be the ACC’s second-best quarterback.

It’s telling that what could’ve been one of the most discussed QB vacancies in the conference was actually among the least interesting this offseason. Coach Bobby Petrino waited until Sunday to make it official, but Gardner was the obvious choice since the spring. Then there’s this: In nine years as a head coach, Petrino’s starting QBs have averaged 63 percent completions, 8.8 yards per attempt, 21 TDs and 8 interceptions -- stats that would’ve rivaled any QB in the league last year, save Winston and Tajh Boyd.

3. Virginia Tech wins 10 again.

The Hokies won at least 10 games in each of their first eight seasons in the ACC, but that streak ended in 2012 and the team is just 10-10 against Power Five conference foes in the past two years. But coach Frank Beamer is giving his young talent a chance to shine, the Week 2 date with Ohio State suddenly looks a lot more winnable and the rest of the schedule shapes up nicely for the Hokies. The offense needs to get a lot better to be a legit College Football Playoff contender, but Virginia Tech will at least be in the conversation.

4. Virginia goes bowling.

The schedule makes this a tough sell. Ten of Virginia’s 12 opponents played in a bowl game last year, and there may not be a single easy win on the slate. But there’s talent in Charlottesville, including 19 four- or five-star recruits inked in the past four years. That’s more than Louisville (16) and just one fewer than Virginia Tech (20). That talent has to translate to wins eventually, right? It’ll take some upsets, but the Hoos will get to six wins.

5. Clemson is a running team.

With Boyd and Sammy Watkins stealing the bulk of the headlines the past three years, Clemson’s passing game got a lot of credit for the team’s success. But the Tigers actually ranked in the top three in the ACC in rushing attempts in each of those three seasons. Now with a new QB and significant turnover at receiver, the passing game is a question, but Dabo Swinney loves his tailbacks. Don’t be surprised if freshman Wayne Gallman tops 1,000 yards -- something a Clemson tailback has done each of the past three seasons.

6. Young runners make a big impact.

Gallman won’t be the only rookie runner to make noise in 2014. The ACC has some impressive veterans in Duke Johnson, Karlos Williams, Kevin Parks and Dominique Brown, but there are plenty of fresh faces eager to make an impact, too. Virginia Tech’s Marshawn Williams, North Carolina’s Elijah Hood and Florida State’s Dalvin Cook could join Gallman as freshman sensations, while sophomores like T.J. Logan, James Conner, Myles Willis, Matt Dayes and Taquan Mizzell could all have big seasons, too.

7. Stacy Coley catches a TD from three different QBs.

If there was a more settled QB situation at Miami, Coley might be a niche pick for Heisman honors as one of the game’s most explosive players. Unfortunately, it could be a revolving door at QB for the Canes. Freshman Brad Kaaya gets first crack, and the hope is that Ryan Williams will return from an ACL injury sooner than later. Don’t be surprised if Jake Heaps or Kevin Olsen gets a shot to start at some point, too. Coley will make them all look better, but he’d benefit from some stability at QB.

8. Jamison Crowder sets the standard.

Crowder had 30 more targets last season than any other ACC receiver, and now Duke is without its second-best pass-catcher in Braxton Deaver. That makes Crowder an even more integral part of the Blue Devils’ passing game, and it means he should cruise past former teammate Conner Vernon’s ACC record for receiving yards. Crowder is just 1,152 yards short entering the season.

9. Tyler Murphy and Jacoby Brissett look good.

Boston College and NC State will both be starting QBs who transferred from Florida, and both have a chance to put up solid numbers. In fact, we're predicting both Murphy and Brissett post better stats this season than Jeff Driskel, the man who kept them both on the bench in Gainesville.

10. The Coastal champ will be ...

Is there really any answer here that would feel remotely safe? Heck, Georgia Tech could win the division or miss out on a bowl game. Anything seems possible. But since it’s prediction time, we’ll ante up, just so you can remind us how wrong we were in December. So, let’s say ... Virginia Tech.

ACC morning links

August, 26, 2014
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ESPN Stats & Information has unveiled its first set of conference power rankings for 2014.

What if I told you the ACC was ranked fifth?

Not surprising in the least.

At this point, it is hard to see the ranking as a huge slap at the league, considering the ACC also was ranked fifth in the final 2013 conference power rankings with a national championship and Orange Bowl win to brag about. The ranking speaks to the state of the entire conference, which we all can agree needs to upgrade its product behind the Noles and Tigers.

The key difference between last season and this season, though, is the College Football Playoff. And conference ranking could come into play when the selection committee begins its evaluations. Because strength of schedule will matter. As our friends at Stats & Info point out in their post:
Among Power Five conferences, the ACC is considered the weakest by both the AP Poll and FPI. That means that if the top four conferences place a team in the playoff, it would leave the ACC on the outside looking in. Yet, there is a lot more that goes into those decisions, including the fact that the ACC has the clear No. 1 team in the country. Florida State received 57 of 60 first place votes in the AP Poll and has by far the best chance (39 percent) to finish the season undefeated according to ESPN’s Football Power Index.

However, what if Florida State loses a conference game? Does the relative strength of the ACC come into play?

All fun questions to ponder before the season begins.

Let's take a tour around the rest of the ACC as the games quickly approach:
  • Boston College may use its running backs out of the backfield more than it did a year ago.
  • Clemson has studied tape from its game against Florida State last year for clues on how Jeremy Pruitt will run the Georgia defense.
  • Duke football has come so far, what if it takes a step back?
  • More fun predictions! Stewart Mandel at FoxSports has Florida State in the playoff and Clemson facing Alabama in the Discover Orange Bowl.
  • Louisville running back Michael Dyer remains doubtful for the opener against Miami.
  • Ryan Williams and Jake Heaps talk about Brad Kaaya winning the Miami quarterback job.
  • Joe Giglio has a great read on NC State quarterback Jacoby Brissett, who has high expectations for himself headed into the season.
  • Is North Carolina going to be the Coastal champ? One columnist says yes.
  • Apparently, Larry Fedora takes pleasure in tormenting people.
  • Virginia Tech coach Frank Beamer compared freshman receiver Isaiah Ford to Antonio Freeman.
  • Could Kevin Johnson and Merrill Noel be Wake Forest's best cornerbacks ... ever?
Their friendship, in many ways, was born of frustration.

For two seasons, Jacoby Brissett and Tyler Murphy worked alongside each other on Florida's practice fields and film room, in the weight room and the meeting rooms, but throughout the entirety of 2011 and 2012 they combined to make just one start. They'd push each other to get better, but more often, they bonded during long conversations about stifled dreams and brighter futures.

[+] EnlargeJacoby Brissett
Ethan Hyman/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT/Getty ImagesJacoby Brissett will face high expectations as NC State's starting QB, but the transfer from Florida is happy to take on the challenge given he'll at least be on the field.
"Sitting on the bench isn't fun," Murphy said. "We tried to build a friendship where we keep each other up, keep each other motivated and each and every day find a way to go into the office and get better. Until we both decided we needed to move on."

For years, there was a nebulous finish line, a point when Murphy and Brissett hoped at least one of them might be a starter. Now, there's a date circled on the calendar for both quarterbacks: Oct. 11, 2014. It's the day Brissett, now the starting QB at NC State, and Murphy, now the starter at Boston College, will go head to head on the field.

After it became clear Brissett's career at Florida had plateaued in 2012, he decided it was time to transfer. He sat down with Murphy and mapped out his options. West Virginia seemed a possibility, but the coaching staff there was eager to compare Brissett with former Moutaineers QB Geno Smith, and Brissett had already spent too much time living in the shadows of other players.

"I was like, 'I'm not the next Geno,'" Brissett said. "I wanted to be Jacoby, and I felt like [NC State] was a place I could do that."

Brissett already knew NC State coach Dave Doeren from his recruitment, which made the transition a bit easier. Still, Brissett would have to sit out a year because of NCAA transfer rules, which meant one more year watching from the sidelines.

At Florida, a season-ending injury to incumbent Jeff Driskel finally gave Murphy his first opportunity to start. He threw the first pass of his four-year career on Sept. 21, 2013 against Tennessee, and he started the next six games for the Gators -- four of them losses. Although Murphy had some solid outings, the losses dogged him. A shoulder injury ended his season in November, and by then it was clear Driskel would be back atop the depth chart when he was healthy.

With one year of eligibility left, Murphy began to think about following Brissett out the door, and, as a New England native, Boston College seemed like an ideal fit.

"He was telling me Boston College was one of the schools he was looking at, and I was like, 'Oh, Boston College is one of the teams we play,'" Brissett said. "So as much as I wanted to tell him to be positive as the season went, I was hoping he'd go to Boston College just so I could play him. But I remember him countless times saying he wanted to stay, he didn't want to transfer."

But what Murphy wanted more than anything was a chance to play, so Brissett offered some advice: Make a decision and don't look back.

"You can't say I'm going to transfer and then say never mind because everybody knows you want to leave," Brissett said. "So just do it and get it over with, know where you want to go. And no matter where you go, if they're taking you right now, you're pretty much going to be the starter. So make sure when you go there, play how you play and you'll be fine. Everything else will take care of itself."

So far, it has.

[+] EnlargeTyler Murphy
John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe/Getty ImagesQB Tyler Murphy has found a new home at Boston College, and he can't wait for the Eagles' visit to NC State on Oct. 11 so he can face a familiar friend.
Brissett was the best quarterback on NC State's roster last season, and although he was relegated to a redshirt, Doeren had already begun grooming him for a starting role in 2014.

Murphy didn't have the luxury of preparation at Boston College, but the Eagles' depth chart offered few other options, and he was installed as the team's starter almost from Day 1.

The two QBs still talk nearly every day -- no longer trading stories about what it might be like to start, but instead debating the ways they still needed to get better now that they're No. 1 on their respective depth charts.

And yes, there's still some sour feelings about Florida, about the opportunities that never developed there. It's not anger or frustration, but rather a drive to prove something to the coaches who doubted them.

"You want to show them why you transferred and show them you could play at the highest level," Brissett said. "Whatever they said you couldn't do, you go out there and do it. All it takes is the right person, the right situation and the right coach to say, 'You're my guy.' And I'm pretty sure Murph's thinking the same thing. It's not worrying about Florida, it's worrying about ourselves."

And of course there's still that date looming on the calendar, when Brissett and Murphy are finally reunited. They've talked about that a lot, too.

But just like those long days of practice at Florida, the chatter isn't about competition so much as it is about the future, about what they've worked so hard to achieve.

"It will definitely be kind of weird to go up against somebody you've grinded with and stayed after practice and done drills with and watched film with, and give each other tips to get better," Murphy said. "But I think it'll be exciting and I think it'll be a fun game to play and I think it'll be a great atmosphere."

After all, it's the perfect scenario for both QBs. On every snap from scrimmage, either Murphy or Brissett will be on the field, and that's really all they ever wanted.

"As corny as it sounds, it puts a smile on your face to see one of your good friends doing what you know he wants to do," Brissett said. "We had those countless talks when we were playing with each other -- 'Man I wish I was out there playing.' And now I'm going to get to see first hand, see him play."
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Bye-bye, Clint and Jacob. Hello, Jacoby, Jake, Michael and Tyler?

You're forgiven if this entire exercise seems foreign. But at least 10 of the ACC's 14 teams will start new faces under center when games kick off next week. And there is a good chance that four of those 10 will have quarterbacks who began their college careers elsewhere.

[+] EnlargeJake Heaps
AP Photo/Orlin WagnerNot long after playing in Kansas' spring game in April, Jake Heaps transferred to Miami.
Two former Florida State quarterbacks could square off in Week 1 in Atlanta during an SEC-Big 12 matchup. Two former Florida quarterbacks are set to start in the ACC's Atlantic Division. Then there are a pair of downtrodden Coastal powers, both of which may be starting quarterbacks who did not even arrive on campus until this summer.

"I really don't know," Miami coach Al Golden said of the surplus of ACC quarterback transfers. "We liked where we were in the spring, and clearly Ryan [Williams] went down the week before the spring game. It's really not a function of not being confident in the guys that are on campus. It's more a function of just wanting to get a guy that has been in the game and has the experience."

Golden acknowledged the quarterback market has been busier than usual, particularly in his league. He brought in former BYU and Kansas quarterback Jake Heaps this summer after Williams, the Hurricanes' No. 1 quarterback, suffered a right ACL injury that will keep him out for an indefinite period of time. (Williams, naturally, began his career elsewhere, at Memphis.)

Heaps, eligible immediately as a graduate transfer, is battling true freshman Brad Kaaya to start Miami's opener.

"I think the quarterback position has grown in terms of talent over the last few years," said Heaps, who set several freshman records at BYU in 2010 before losing his job both with the Cougars and later at Kansas. "There’s a lot of great, quality quarterbacks in college football right now and they all want a chance to play. That’s where you’re seeing a lot of these guys transfer. They’re in their situation but they know they can play somewhere else so they make those moves and try and find the best situation for them and in some cases it works out, in others it doesn’t. Just knowing they have that opportunity is first and foremost.

"Sometimes things just don’t work out. Recruiting is the way it is and sometimes a situation isn’t what you think it will be when you get there. It’s been a unique trend in the last little bit, but I think if a guy has an opportunity to go play, he should go explore that."

Likewise, fellow Coastal member Virginia Tech turned to the free-agent route following an underwhelming spring from its three quarterbacks, welcoming Texas Tech transfer Michael Brewer (and two true freshmen) to the race to replace Logan Thomas and kick-start an offense in need of a jolt after just 15 wins in the past two seasons. In an odd twist, Brewer, who has two seasons left to play after graduating from Texas Tech, was recommended to the Hokies' staff by Clemson offensive coordinator Chad Morris, who coached Brewer back at Lake Travis (Texas) High.

Brewer brings with him a nearly 71 percent completion percentage from his limited action with the Red Raiders, including 440 passing yards, five touchdowns and no interceptions.

[+] EnlargeJacoby Brissett
AP Photo/Gerry BroomeEx-Florida quarterback Jacoby Brissett enters this season as NC State's starter.
"Everyone needs success in their life, and if you're in a place where you're behind somebody or whatever you're not going to have it," Virginia Tech coach Frank Beamer said. "To me, my whole thing is everyone needs success, and wherever you can do that, some of the guys that come through there, go somewhere where you can have success."

On the other side, in the more daunting Atlantic, a pair of second-year coaches are turning to former Gators quarterbacks to command their offenses.

Boston College coach Steve Addazio goes back with Tyler Murphy, a fellow Connecticut native whom Addazio had initially recruited to Gainesville, Florida, during his time as an assistant there. Jacoby Brissett transferred to NC State shortly after coach Dave Doeren was hired there, sitting out last season and taking enough initiative behind the scenes to earn the starting nod before spring ball this year.

“Last year we brought in Brandon Mitchell [from Arkansas] through the one-year loophole, and then at the end of the year, Pete Thomas and Manny Stocker left to go to [Louisiana-Monroe and UT-Martin]," Doeren said. "While that was going on, Jacoby transferred here from Florida. So I’ve seen about all of it that can go around. It’s just part of what recruiting is now. Guys want to play and people don’t want to wait their turn much anymore."

Murphy, who transferred in January, has one year to add some pizzazz to an Eagles' offense looking to spread the field more after last season's run-heavy approach. He spoke often with Brissett (who has two years left at NC State) back when both were still weighing their options when departing Florida.

The familiarity was more than enough to reunite Murphy with Addazio, who said a guy like Murphy probably should have gone to BC in the first place.

"Being a New England guy and growing up around BC, I watched a lot of BC and Matt Ryan in the early 2000s," Murphy said. "So it feels good to be a part of this institution, this program and I'm looking forward to the season."

Florida State could see a pair of its former quarterbacks start against each other next week, as Jake Coker transferred to Alabama one year after Clint Trickett transferred to West Virginia.

Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher was supportive of both, with Trickett being familiar with WVU (his dad used to coach there before moving to FSU) and Coker heading to his home-state program after backing up Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston. Fisher likened the rash of quarterback departures to that of college basketball transfers, because both are possession-dominated athletes.

The graduate-transfer rule, popularized by Russell Wilson three years ago, has only added to that. And, in many ways, it has been a boon for both sides.

"[It] gives some opportunities for guys that are worried about situations like Tyler's," Addazio said, referring to Murphy's injury-shortened 2013. "He's like, 'I've got one shot at this thing. I want to go where I feel like I've got the best opportunity to be the starter.' So you're seeing a lot of this right now. I like this opportunity."

Mariota-WinstonAP Photo, Getty ImagesOregon's Marcus Mariota and Florida State's Jameis Winston are the consensus top two quarterbacks in the country. Winston was better in 2013, but many think 2014 will be Mariota's year.
Reel it in, Florida State fans. They’re only projections.

ESPN.com and FoxSports.com released their preseason All-American teams Thursday, and Marcus Mariota received the quarterback nod above Jameis Winston in both, unleashing the hounds in Tallahassee and the Florida panhandle.

At the end of the day, there can be only one quarterback on the preseason team, and Mariota and Winston have the strongest cases for the nomination, without question. But while Winston is the reigning Heisman Trophy winner and had an unprecedented season for a freshman, it is quite conceivable that Mariota will have a better 2014 season, at least statistically. An All-American selection isn’t a qualifier to be the best player in the country, which Winston was voted in ESPN.com’s player rankings. Tom Brady has three Super Bowl rings and a 21-game winning streak, yet has only been a first-team All-Pro selection twice.

Last season, Mariota threw 31 touchdowns to just four interceptions. He has only 10 interceptions in his two seasons. He’s totaled 700 yards rushing in both of his seasons, too. In Oregon’s up-tempo offense, if Mariota remains healthy, he could improve on all of those numbers.

The narrative all offseason was how it will be tough for Winston to replicate his 2013 numbers, which consisted of more than 4,000 passing yards and 40 touchdowns. With two of his top receivers gone, the passing game might not be as efficient, and coach Jimbo Fisher could rely on his rushing attack more in 2014.

Is it contrarian to select Mariota over the reigning Heisman winner and a quarterback yet to lose a game? Sure, but that does not mean there is not a legitimate argument for Mariota to be an All-American at the end of the season. And if the preseason team is a projection based on 2014 and not a reflection of 2013, Mariota has a sensible case for the quarterback nomination.

Here are a few more ACC links to get your weekend started:
With the news that Ohio State lost quarterback Braxton Miller for the season, USA Today wondered what the effect might be of a major injury on a few of the other top College Football Playoff candidates, including Florida State.

[+] EnlargeSean Maguire
Melina Vastola/USA TODAY SportsEven with second-stringer Sean Maguire at quarterback, Florida State would be an ACC favorite. But maybe not a national favorite.
According to the story, a switch from Jameis Winston to Sean Maguire at QB would mean roughly 10 fewer points per game and two fewer wins for FSU.
Substitute Maguire for Winston and the Noles still win the ACC championship, but without Winston they only average 33.9 points per game and win 9.4 games on average.

The Orlando Sentinel digs a bit deeper, looking at what the ramifications of a Winston injury might be for the Seminoles.

I didn’t crunch any serious numbers, as USA Today did, or dig too deep into the roster the way the Sentinel did, but if I was putting together a list of the ACC’s most irreplaceable players, it’d probably look something like this:

1. Winston — for obvious reasons, as discussed above.

2. Duke Johnson — We saw what happened last year when he went down. Miami was 7-0 with him healthy, 2-4 when he wasn’t on the field the whole game. Not to mention the Hurricanes' rushing average was cut in half.

3. Jamison Crowder - The guy was targeted 174 times last year (40 more than Sammy Watkins) and that was before Duke lost Braxton Deaver and Brandon Connette.

4. Eli Harold - The guy averaged 24 more snaps per game than All-American Vic Beasley did, and Virginia’s defense is predicated on penetrating the line of scrimmage.

5. Jacoby Brissett — OK, NC State might not do much this year even with Brissett, but what’s the option if he goes down? The Pack’s hopes for 2014 are riding almost entirely on his shoulders, and unlike last year, there’s actually some reason for optimism.

Beyond that top five, Mario Edwards Jr., Luther Maddy, Norkeithus Otis and Tyler Boyd come to mind, too.

Of course, there’s surely a few more players left off the list that warrant discussion. So, who’d we miss?

A few more links:

  • The (Syracuse) Post-Standard has Virginia’s Mike London as the ACC’s only coach on the hot seat this season. One reason London is on the hot seat: a lack of production in spite of talent. Virginia is 18-31 under London. Only eight other teams have performed worse during the past four years, and of that group, only Cal has signed more four-star and five-star recruits than the 19 signed by London, according to ESPN’s rankings. (Of note: Kentucky has signed 16, but 14 have come in the last two years since Mark Stoops was hired as head coach. The other six programs with worse records than Virginia during that stretch have signed just 30 four-star or five-star recruits.)
  • The Wall Street Journal took a look at how each Power 5 conference coach has done against top-25 opposition in his career. The Louisville Courier-Journal followed up with a deeper look at Bobby Petrino’s credentials as well as a look at the individual ACC coaches.
  • There are still plenty of starting jobs up for grabs on the Virginia Tech offensive depth chart, as The Roanoke Times points out.
  • For years, Jim Grobe avoided playing true freshmen at Wake Forest. In the first season under Dave Clawson, it appears as many as nine will get a chance to play in this year’s opener, the Winston-Salem Journal writes.
  • And on related notes, earlier this week Matt Fortuna wrote a bit about Clawson’s journey to Wake Forest, and Jared Shanker looked at the programs most apt to play true freshmen.
  • Duke certainly projects to have a speedy secondary, which has earned the unit a unique nickname, writes the Charlotte Observer.
  • Steven Daniels is in line to be the next great middle linebacker at Boston College, writes the Boston Herald.
  • And lastly, if you don’t hear from me for the next 10 days, it’s because FXX is marathoning every “The Simpsons” episode ever, starting today. Here’s the full schedule if you’re portioning out your time to the most important episodes (“Marge vs. the Monorail is tomorrow at 9 p.m.) and here’s your requisite Simpsons gif to showcase my feelings about the event.

ACC morning links

August, 18, 2014
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Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher says he’s checking homework.

“We have notepads and pencils and you’re required to take notes,” Fisher said last week. “We’ll check them periodically.”

The fifth-year Seminoles coach was referring to his mandate that his players keep their eyes forward and jot down diligent outlines during positional meetings. I asked Fisher’s policy on taking notes after the Wall Street Journal published an article on the philosophy of the Cleveland Browns' Mike Pettine, a first-time head coach.

A former high school coach, Pettine found out from other teachers how actually putting pen to paper improves the odds a student will retain the information and retrieve the lesson when it’s test time. Kevin Clark, the WSJ writer, spoke with a UCLA professor who co-authored a paper on how writing instead of typing is often more useful, this at a time when there might be more laptops than notepads in college classrooms throughout the country.

It’s an interesting concept as it relates to football, which is catching up to the rest of the country in its fascination with technology. Several professional and college teams are using GPS tracking during practice. A handful, Florida State included, have armed players with tablets, and the Seminoles have a tablet in each player’s locker. Advanced metrics, usually reserved for baseball stat heads, are creeping their way onto football coaches’ desks. Drones are even being used to add yet another camera angle of practices.

But, even during football's technological revolution, it goes to show that sometimes simpler is better -- at least when it comes to filing away that the fullback is always option No. 1 on Spider 2 Y Banana.

“They’re taking a test every week, except they have to do it in front of 83,000 instead of a classroom,” Fisher said.

Here are a few more links to check out:
  • FSU is No. 1 in both preseason polls. That is due in large part to QB Jameis Winston, who took on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and then nominated his coach to do the same.
  • Miami was in the bottom half of the ACC blog's preseason power rankings, and much of that has to do with questions at quarterback and the defensive line. However, freshman QB Brad Kaaya is impressing the team with his maturity, and the defensive front is improving through camp.
  • Clemson opens the season at Georgia, but the Tigers will open up their home stadium so their fans can watch the game from inside Death Valley. The Bulldogs might be hurting on defense with a few losses during the offseason, but the Tigers' offense has not consistently impressed the Clemson coaches yet this fall. Chad Morris said quarterbacks Cole Stoudt and Deshaun Watson made some "really lousy decisions" in the latest scrimmage.
  • Louisville also held a weekend scrimmage, and Cardinals fans should be happy with the offense. The unit's pace and its future quarterback were among the five biggest takeaways.
  • Boston College's scrimmage looked like Christmas morning, which is not a good thing for an offense. Hint: They gift-wrapped turnovers.
  • An Atlantic division outlook from the (Charlottesville, Virginia) Daily Progress.
  • A few notes from Syracuse's Saturday practice.
  • Defense was optional in the Triangle in 2013, but there are defensive playmakers at Duke, NC State and North Carolina.
  • Nobody is quite sure what to expect out of Blacksburg, Virginia, this season: Does Virginia Tech continue to slide or are the Hokies poised for a return to double-digit wins? Frank Beamer believes it is the latter.
  • Georgia Tech defensive coordinator Ted Roof sees signs that the Yellow Jackets' defense is improving, but that doesn't mean the unit is where it needs to be.
  • The name Kenechi Udeze might ring a bell for some football fans. He was a first-round NFL draft pick not long ago, but cancer cut his career short. He's back involved with the sport he loves, though, as a first-year assistant strength and conditioning coach at Pitt.

NC State Wolfpack season preview

August, 14, 2014
Aug 14
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video » More team previews: ACC | Big 12 | Big Ten | Pac-12 | SEC

Previewing the 2014 season for the NC State Wolfpack:

Key returners: RB Shadrach Thornton (768 yards, 4 TD), WR Bryan Underwood (32 catches, 382 yards), OT Joe Thuney, DE Art Norman (9 TFL, 4.5 sacks), DT Thomas Teal (10.5 TFL, 3 sacks), S Hakim Jones (61 tackles, 2 INT), LB Brandon Pittman (63 tackles, 8 TFL, 3 sacks)

Key losses: WR Rashard Smith, WR Quintin Payton, DB Dontae Johnson, LB D.J. Green, LB Robert Caldwell

Most important games: Sept. 27 versus FSU, Oct. 4 at Clemson, Oct. 18 at Louisville, Nov. 29 at North Carolina

Projected win percentage: .479

Vegas over/under: 5.5 wins

[+] EnlargeShadrach Thornton
MCT via Getty ImagesShadrach Thornton rushed for 768 yards and four touchdowns last season.
Instant impact newcomers: Jacoby Brissett sat out 2013 after transferring from Florida. He’ll now be counted on not just as the team’s starting quarterback, but as its offensive leader and, in many ways, the program’s savior. Freshman wideout Bo Hines had a huge spring game and has quickly emerged as one of Brissett’s favorite targets. Defensive end Kentavius Street and tackle Justin Jones could add some serious physicality to a defensive line that was often boom-or-bust in 2013.

Biggest question mark: For a team that went winless in ACC play last year, there are plenty of question marks. Brissett’s emergence is chief among them, but coach Dave Doeren seems more than pleased with his QB. Who will emerge among the young receivers for Brissett to throw to? Can the offensive line protect better than it did a year ago? Can the defensive line be more consistently disruptive? Can injured veterans like Underwood, Rob Crisp and Jarvis Byrd come back to make an impact? The list goes on and on, but there’s certainly hope that the Wolfpack have far more answers than they did a year ago.

Best-case scenario for 2014: Brissett proves to be the answer to many of last year’s offensive woes and instantly transforms the Wolfpack into a more dynamic team. The running game proves a strength and the defensive line routinely disrupts the opposition’s game plan. Injured veterans return and young depth emerges. NC State improves as the season progresses, pulls off an upset or two, and returns to postseason play with seven or eight wins.

Worst-case scenario for 2014: Brissett isn’t the answer State’s fans had hoped for, and he struggles with a shaky supporting cast. The offensive line never comes together and the defensive front can’t stop the run. Early tests against FSU and Clemson sink the season, and the Wolfpack limp to another lowly finish in an increasingly difficult division.

Number to know: 100, 100, 100. State tailback Matt Dayes is one of just four returning ACC players to accumulate 100 yards rushing, receiving and in the return game last year. He’s not exactly entrenched atop the Wolfpack’s depth chart now, but Doeren did show a propensity for utilizing his most versatile talent last season, when Rashard Smith topped 100 yards rushing (121), receiving (530), on kick returns (310) and punt returns (240). Dayes could easily fill a similar all-purpose role this year.

They said it: “He wants to win, and it's personal. He's got to go do it. We've got to get players around him to help him and all those things, but he has the skill set and the intangibles that you look for when you recruit that position.” - Doeren on Brissett’s role as the team’s leader

ACC morning links

August, 14, 2014
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The Roanoke Times reports that Michael Brewer is now considered a co-starter with Mark Leal at Virginia Tech.

Frank Beamer says Brenden Motley is due to return to practice following a back injury next week, but with the Hokies scrimmaging Saturday, all indications point to a two-man race with the winner likely being decided this weekend. Beamer says he wants a decision made sooner than later so the team has time to build a rapport with the new starter.

I talked with Beamer on Wednesday, and he spoke highly of Brewer’s ability to grasp the system in a hurry and command the huddle.

“His personality, who he is, it lends himself to that,” Beamer said. “He’s a take-charge guy, likes being in control. It lends itself to him coming in and feeling at ease with the position he’s in.”

Beamer praised Brewer’s accuracy, too, but he said the key for either QB will be more consistency from the receivers when it comes to route running and drops. And on the subject of the receivers, Beamer absolutely raved about freshmen Cameron Phillips and Isaiah Ford.

“Those are two guys that are going to really help our group,” Beamer said. “They’re two athletic guys.”

A few more links:
  • Dabo Swinney was none too happy with his team after its scrimmage Wednesday, telling reporters, “I thought we hit the wall.” Probably not worth reading too much into the outburst. Good coaches always pick at least one practice to publicly call out their team, and as we hit the midpoint of August, it was probably time for Swinney to give Clemson a minor wake-up call.
  • Sports Illustrated has its preseason All-America teams out, with 14 ACC players making first- or second-team status. Only the SEC (16) had more. A few ACC names not on the list that we wouldn’t be surprised to see at year’s end? Clemson’s Grady Jarrett, FSU’s Karlos Williams and Ronald Darby and Miami’s Duke Johnson.
  • Speaking of Johnson, he looked 100 percent as Miami scrimmaged for the first time, writes the Miami Herald. The QB race, however, remains as murky as ever, with Jake Heaps and freshman Brad Kaaya doing battle Wednesday.
  • With Telvin Smith and Christian Jones gone, Terrance Smith is taking command of the Florida State linebacking crew, writes the Tallahassee Democrat. Smith has 69 career tackles. Reggie Northrup has 55. The rest of the linebacking corps combined has just 71.
  • NC State QB Garrett Leatham wasn’t even one of the top 20 walk-ons to make it into fall camp a year ago. Now, writes the Charlotte Observer, he’s got a scholarship and the No. 2 spot on the Wolfpack’s depth chart. Good for Leatham, of course, but it does suggest just how critical a healthy Jacoby Brissett will be for NC State in 2014.
  • Duke checks in at No. 24 on USA Today’s college football countdown. Their “dream season” scenario for Duke is an 11-1 campaign with the lone loss coming to Virginia Tech. Of course, the Blue Devils beat the Hokies in Blacksburg last year while mustering 198 yards of offense and failing to convert a third down. So, it’s all relative.
  • Breaking news of your impending transfer via Instagram is apparently a thing now, as freshman receiver Corey Cooper announced he was leaving the Orange, writes Syracuse.com. Can recruiting via Tinder be too far off?

ACC recruits who fill biggest needs 

August, 12, 2014
Aug 12
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RecruitingNation takes a look at the 2015 recruits who most fill the needs of each of the ACC schools.

ACC morning links

August, 12, 2014
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Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher was in his element Sunday during his media day news conference. He was no longer answering questions about Jameis Winston or crab legs. Fisher was talking X's and O's, talking Football 101.

Fisher talked at length about how he studies a player to determine a his physical ceiling and what kind of bone structure and body type recruits possess. Fisher said it is not the deciding factor when he recruits a prospect, but it is without a doubt a factor. He likened it to basketball, where coaches often are more in love with a player's wingspan or vertical jump than his ability to shoot the basketball from 15 to 18 feet.

A protege of Nick Saban, Fisher likes physically stout players along the defensive line. Some of his defensive ends tip the scales at 300 pounds but still move as if they were 25 pounds lighter. He and Saban had them at LSU a decade ago, and Fisher has one at Florida State in Mario Edwards Jr., who was able to chase down Auburn's Nick Marshall on an option play.

Brendan Sonnone of the Orlando Sentinel took a look at how Fisher has recruited during his tenure and the size of the players he has brought in.The class that signed in February averages 6-foot-3.5 and weighs 249 pounds. To put that into perspective, Bobby Bowden's final class at Florida State was two inches shorter and 26 pounds lighter.

While this 2014 class could be a bit of an outlier due to the sheer numbers of linemen Fisher signed, the statistics still offer an insight into how Fisher recruits. Defensive coordinator Charles Kelly also said Sunday that he knows Fisher is looking for a certain body type depending on the position, so Kelly needs to take that into account when he's visiting high schools.

Here's a few more links to get your Tuesday started.

ACC rivalry heat meters

August, 11, 2014
Aug 11
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Rivalries are an intrinsic part of college football, but not every rivalry is created equal. And every rivalry goes through cycles as each team has its own ups and downs. The Alabama-Auburn could be reaching new heights, but only after Auburn won six straight and then Alabama won four of five.

The ACC has its own share of intense rivalries, some peaking, others fading. Here is a look at some of the conference’s best rivalries and how each is faring.

Florida State vs. Miami

The facts: Miami leads the series 31-27, although Jimbo Fisher has dominated the Hurricanes during his head coaching tenure. The fifth-year Seminoles coach is 4-0 and has doubled up Miami in points over those four games.

The meter: Room temperature

For the better part of two decades this iconic rivalry was as hot as the Florida sun, but simultaneous struggles by both programs cooled what could have been considered the country’s best rivalry at one point. With Florida State back as an annual national title contender and Miami still yet to make an ACC title game, the two fan bases see this rivalry in a different light at the moment. FSU fans expect to beat Miami right now; Canes fans hope to derail the Seminoles’ title hopes. It looked as if the rivalry was making a comeback last season when both teams entered the game undefeated, but Florida State rolled Miami. If The U can ever return to the ranks of college football’s elite and with both programs now in the ACC, this could once again be a rivalry that dictates the national landscape. And with FSU in the Atlantic and Miami in the Coastal division, there could be repeat matches in the ACC championship game, with the winner moving on to the College Football Playoff.

Clemson vs. Florida State

The facts: Florida State leads the series 19-8, and the Seminoles are coming off a 51-14 trouncing of the Tigers in Death Valley.

The meter: Boiling

And it could boil over soon, possibly when the two reconvene Sept. 20 in Tallahassee, Florida. The Tigers were undefeated and a national title contender last October when they were embarrassed on their home field. The offseason is naturally a period for temperatures to settle, but Jameis Winston fanned the flames in March by tweeting a picture of Clemson’s stadium with the caption “our house.” During ACC media days, Tigers defensive end Vic Beasley said he felt disrespected that most believed Florida State would run through the ACC. Beasley, who finished second to Winston in the ACC preseason Player of the Year vote, told ESPN.com recently he believes the Tigers’ defense is good enough to hand Winston his first career loss.

Duke vs. North Carolina

The facts: Nothing says college football like two schools disagreeing on the all-time series record with the disputed game dating back to … wait for it … 1889. UNC claims a 59-37-4 record and Duke feels it trails only 38-58-4.

The meter: Heating up, NBA Jam style.

The Tar Heels won 21 of 22 games from 1990-2011, although two of those wins would later be vacated. But you get the point: This was as one-sided of a rivalry as you could possibly get. Up until 2012, the only noteworthy factoid of this game was the 1889 game where both teams claimed a win, accusing the other of ducking out of the game. David Cutcliffe’s vision of Duke becoming the East Coast’s version of Stanford is coming together, though, and the Blue Devils have been one of the better ACC teams over the past two seasons. In 2014, the prime time Thursday game on Nov. 20 could decide the ACC Coastal Division.

Dabo vs. Ol’ Ball Coach

The facts: Clemson leads the series 65-42-4, but Steve Spurrier holds a 4-1 edge over Dabo Swinney. The irony is Swinney’s win came as interim coach in 2008, and it might have helped him land the Clemson gig.

The meter: Like bacon grease in a hot skillet.

The repartee between these two is the best part of this rivalry, helping elevate it to a national level. Swinney made it known the Tigers are the only school from the Palmetto State to make it to a BCS game, and Spurrier was quick to point out South Carolina beat Clemson in both of those seasons. In July when Swinney said Spurrier was from Pluto, Spurrier quipped that Pluto was no longer considered a planet. The banter has raised the rivalry’s profile outside the state of South Carolina, and considering both programs figure to be annual College Football Playoff contenders, the country isn’t going get to tired of listening to these two for quite some time.

Miami vs. Virginia Tech

The facts: The Hurricanes lead the all-time series, although both have been middle-of-the pack programs the past few seasons.

The meter: Cooling

It was thought these two would annually compete for Coastal titles, but their most intense battles occurred during the Big East’s heyday. The Hokies are 13-11 over the past two seasons, and Miami is still climbing back to national relevancy. There is certainly potential for this rivalry to earn its place back among the national landscape, but there are no definitive signs that both of these programs are making their way back toward the top 10 of the rankings.

Florida vs. Florida State

The facts: Florida leads 34-22-2, but 16 of those 19 wins came before the 1977 season. The series has been much tighter since then.

The meter: Inherently high, but stagnant

Much like the Florida State-Miami rivalry, this annual November contest was one of the most anticipated games each college season. What helped put this rivalry on another level was the dynamics of the coaches, Bobby Bowden and Spurrier. The rivalry has been lacking since Spurrier left the Gators following the 2001 season, though. Urban Meyer pummeled Bowden for five seasons before Fisher turned the tide back in the Seminoles’ favor. In 2012, both teams were 10-1, but that was a flash-in-the-pan season for the Gators, who are 30-21 since 2010. If Florida can bounce back under Will Muschamp, this once again could be one of the premier college rivalries. Both programs are recruiting extremely well.


Virginia vs. Virginia Tech

The facts: Virginia Tech owns a 53-37-5 record against their chief in-state rival.

The meter: Falling, falling, falling.

Never a game that consistently affected the national landscape, this was still a big game within the borders of Virginia, which is underrated when it comes to producing elite high school recruits. A few seasons ago it seemed as if Mike London had turned around Virginia to the point where the Cavaliers would annually compete with the Hokies for conference titles, but UVa is coming off a 2-10 season. It’s not as if Virginia Tech has reeled off the wins as of late, either. The series has had better days.

NC State vs. North Carolina

The facts: The Tar Heels are 65-32-6 against the Wolfpack, although both programs have undergone coaching changes over the past few years.

The meter: Holding steady

Granted, it’s holding steady at a very low level, but there is the opportunity for this rivalry to gain a little more relevancy in the coming seasons. Many feel the Tar Heels are the Coastal favorite in Larry Fedora’s third season, and NC State second-year coach Dave Doeren expects the Wolfpack to be much better in 2014 with transfer quarterback Jacoby Brissett. For now, though, this game plays second and third fiddle to the rest of the rivalry’s involving ACC schools. Check back next year, guys.

Georgia vs. Georgia Tech

The facts: The Bulldogs own a 64-39-5 record against the Yellow Jackets, although Georgia's media guide claims only 37 losses to its in-state rival. Georgia Tech can't dispute that the Bulldogs have owned this series since 2001.

The meter: Surprisingly warm and susceptible to volatile jumps

It's odd to think a series would be subjected to jumps when Georgia has lost only once over the past 13 seasons, but the rivalry has produced some fun games to watch, most recently a double-overtime thriller last November. Only twice since 1997 have both teams been unranked, and during that same span both teams have been ranked seven times. Georgia has routinely been rated higher, but what really rankles Tech fans is that the Bulldogs won both times Tech had the higher ranking entering the game. If you throw out the 2012 game when Georgia won 42-10, since 2004 the game has been decided by an average of seven points.

Florida State vs. Louisville

The facts: Florida State owns a 12-2 record against Louisville, but the teams have not played since 2002. The Cardinals just joined the ACC for this coming season.

The meter: Low but poised for a significant rise

This does not register as a rivalry yet, but it could certainly become one of the more intense games over the course of the next few seasons as Bobby Petrino builds Louisville in his own image. The Cardinals were a BCS-caliber team under Charlie Strong, but Petrino could go through some growing pains. But once he gets his offense in place, this could be a game that determines the ACC Atlantic. Florida State is poised to be one of the ACC's best teams as long as Fisher is the coach, and Petrino's track record suggests he should get Louisville to that level soon enough. Not to mention they're two of the best offensive minds, and who wouldn't want to see these two teams light it up? You can guarantee there won't be any Papa John's pies on the scoreboard when these two play.

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