ACC: Boston College Eagles

ACC's lunchtime links

April, 10, 2014
Apr 10
12:00
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Thoughts with all those affected Wednesday in Pittsburgh.

ACC's lunchtime links

April, 9, 2014
Apr 9
12:00
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What a year for UConn hoops.

ACC's lunch links

April, 7, 2014
Apr 7
12:00
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I'll go with UConn tonight. You?
Steve Addazio knows better than anyone that one man will not have the kind of production for Boston College in 2014 that Andre Williams provided the Eagles last season. The ingredients in the run game this year will feature several more surprises, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the collective production will take a dip.

"Well let's say this: When I took this job a year ago, people didn't even know if Andre Williams would even start here," Addazio said recently. "Then all of a sudden Andre went on and had a great season and became a finalist for the Heisman Trophy. … We're a gap-scheme team. [We] had a really good offensive line last year, we've got a really good offensive line here, and all those factors will go hand-in-hand and we'll be able to achieve productivity.

"We might be more diversified in our run game. Our quarterbacks now are dual-threat quarterbacks, so the defense will have more to worry about in the run game than just one tailback, so that'll open up some opportunities."

The one player who did outclass the others on Saturday, though, was a running back. And he did it in more ways than one.

Myles Willis opened the Jay McGillis spring game with a 95-yard kickoff return for a touchdown. He added 75 yards on the ground. Tyler Rouse was no slouch himself, piling up 68 rushing yards, 41 of which came on a touchdown run.

Florida transfer Tyler Murphy threw for 78 yards in his public debut as a BC quarterback.

Addazio said last week that he was pleased with the intensity of practices, where the Eagles were missing a number of key components due to injury. Like most coaches at this time of the year, he would like more depth. But he knows his offense will be far from the one-trick pony it was for much of his first year in Chestnut Hill, Mass., when Williams seemingly came from out of nowhere to rush for an ACC-record 2,177 yards en route to a surprising 7-6 campaign.

Willis was the primary No. 2 back last season, rushing for 346 yards and two touchdowns. Rouse had 125 yards last season with two touchdowns.

Add to the mix three starters returning on an offensive line that helped pave the way for Williams' historic campaign, and it is easy to see why the Eagles are confident in their different look heading into Addazio's second year.

"I think our diversity in our run game will help us, so I think all those things will factor in," Addazio said. "You're never exactly the same, but you just keep tweaking things, and all that matters is what the output is in the end. It doesn't matter how you get there."

Reviewing the ACC pro days

April, 4, 2014
Apr 4
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Pro days are now in the rearview mirror, with a month remaining between now and the NFL draft. With that, let's take a look back at some notable performances from ACC pro days this year.

Boston College (March 12)
Big name: RB Andre Williams. Representatives from 29 NFL teams were on hand to see the nation's top running back from last season. Williams says he improved on his combine 40-yard-dash time of 4.56. Also of note: Nate Freese, who went 20 of 20 last season on field goal tries, did not disappoint in front of his future employers, hitting a 60-yard try.

[+] EnlargeSammy Watkins
AP Photo/Michael ConroyClemson WR Sammy Watkins in all likelihood will be the first ACC player drafted in May.
Clemson (March 6)
Big name: WR Sammy Watkins. Watkins stood on his 40 time of 4.43 from the combine but was there to help out quarterback Tajh Boyd, doing little to change the general consensus that he is the top receiver in this year's draft. Boyd said scouts told him his performance was much better than his showings at the combine and Senior Bowl, as he connected on short, intermediate and deep routes with familiar receivers in familiar environs.

Duke (March 26)
Big name: CB Ross Cockrell. Cockrell improved on his combine results, with Duke saying that his 40 time was sub-4.4, which is better than what he ran in Indianapolis (4.56).

Florida State (March 17)
Big name: Where to begin? DL Timmy Jernigan slightly improved his combine 40-time from 5.06 to 5.03. S Terrence Brooks, LB Telvin Smith, DB Lamarcus Joyner and LB Christian Jones all drew a crowd, but they declined to run the 40 in front of reps from all 32 NFL teams, content to sit on their combine performances.

Georgia Tech (March 28)
Big name: LB Jeremiah Attaochu. Attaochu ran drills at both linebacker and defensive lineman, recovering nicely from a hamstring injury in the Senior Bowl that forced him out of the combine. He said his 40 time was in the 4.5s. DB Jemea Thomas also impressed, reportedly running a 4.38 40.

Louisville (March 17)
Big name: QB Teddy Bridgewater. With scouts from 29 teams watching, Bridgewater was off target with several of his throws. He ran an unofficial 4.78 40 time, but the potential No. 1 pick misfired on at least 10 passes, leaving some questions lingering heading into the draft.

Miami (April 3)
Big name: OT Seantrel Henderson. This is the name that is going to stick out, as Henderson did not finish his workouts. His agent later told reporters that it was due to dehydration. With 30 NFL teams represented, quarterback Stephen Morris took a strong step forward, reportedly completed almost all of his 67 throws.

North Carolina (March 25)
Big name: TE Eric Ebron. Ebron stood on his 40 time from the combine of 4.60, but his pro day was marred by several dropped passes, though the always upbeat tight end was not stressed about the drops when speaking to reporters afterward.

NC State (March 25)
Big name: CB Dontae Johnson. Johnson showed his versatility, as he can play corner or safety, and he said he felt better than he did at the combine, where he ran a 40 time of 4.45 and jumped 38.5 inches in the vertical.

Pittsburgh (March 3)
Big name: DT Aaron Donald. College football's best defensive player rested on his combine numbers in the 40 (4.68) and bench press (35 times), but teammates Tom Savage and Devin Street helped themselves. Savage impressed during a scripted 100-throw workout while Street said he ran a sub-4.5 40.

Syracuse
Big name: LB Marquis Spruill. Spruill recovered nicely from a combine snub, weighing in at 231 pounds, nine pounds heavier than his playing weight. He did not disclose numbers. Running back Jerome Smith, meanwhile, said he ran in the 4.5-4.6 range, which would be an improvement over his combine time of 4.84.

Virginia (March 17)
Big name: OT Morgan Moses. A considerably different-looking Moses showed up at 311 pounds, roughly 20 pounds lighter from his playing days with the Cavaliers. After clocking in at 5.35 in the 40 at the combine, he unofficially ran between 4.9 and 5.06 at his pro day, though he pulled a hamstring during one of the runs, forcing him to miss the remainder of his drills.

Virginia Tech (March 19)
Big name: QB Logan Thomas. Thomas remains a fascinating prospect to keep an eye on in the NFL, and he threw well in front of NFL scouts at pro day. Corner Antone Exum impressed as well, running 40 times of 4.53 and 4.55.

Wake Forest (March 17)
Big name: WR Michael Campanaro. After seeing his final year end prematurely because of a shoulder injury, Campanaro, the only Demon Deacon to have garnered a combine invite, again impressed in receiver drills, making his case to become a potential mid-round pick. Nose guard Nikita Whitlock, meanwhile, saw himself lining up as a fullback for the first time in his career. Weather conditions were less than ideal for the NFL hopefuls.

ACC's lunchtime links

April, 3, 2014
Apr 3
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Lots of injuries, not a lot of quarterbacks ...
The theme throughout this spring across the ACC has been turnover and uncertainty at quarterback.

[+] EnlargeAnthony Boone
Streeter Lecka/Getty ImagesWith Anthony Boone (and Brandon Connette), Duke has plenty of experience at the QB position in 2014.
But what about those schools that return a good amount of starting experience? Duke returns more career starts than any team in the ACC, just ahead of Florida State. Quarterbacks Anthony Boone and Brandon Connette have combined to start 16 games for the Blue Devils, while Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston has 14 starts for the Noles.

That should give both teams and edge when it comes to defending their respective division crowns. How much of an edge? Depends on the viewpoint. Relying on returning quarterback data alone to predict how a team will do often fails to look at the big picture.

Go back to last season. Duke and Florida State went into 2013 having to replace veterans at quarterback — EJ Manuel had 31 career starts for the Noles, while Sean Renfree had 35 career starts for the Blue Devils. Questions about experience at quarterback followed both teams into the season. Indeed, Clemson was picked to finish ahead of Florida State thanks in large part to returning starter Tajh Boyd, going into his third season behind center.

Those questions, however, were quickly answered as both Duke and Florida State went on to play for the ACC championship. Miami, Virginia Tech and North Carolina -- all picked to finish ahead of Duke -- returned multi-year starters at quarterback but that was not enough to win the division. Boyd did not help Clemson win an ACC title, but the Tigers did make a BCS game and won 11 contests. Tanner Price, one of the most experienced quarterbacks in the ACC last season, could not help Wake Forest get back to a bowl game.

Still, returning a starting quarterback is almost always preferable. Not every redshirt freshman is going to win the Heisman the way Winston did in Year 1 as a starter. Boone, who had his share of ups and downs early last season as he transitioned to a starting role, has now been on both sides.

“You’re obviously going to have some growing pains with quarterbacks who haven’t played many snaps, young quarterbacks going into their first year as a starter,” Boone said recently. “I just feel like that’s something we’re capable of avoiding, that’s something that should be to our advantage, having the knowledge of different teams in our league, just knowing tendencies of what team plays what kind of defense, just having that knowledge going into next year. I feel like it’s good to if you have one, but we have two who have been there. It’s a good feeling. It lets our offensive coordinator be at ease because we have the ability to fix a lot of play calls that have been called, if something happens. I feel that knowledge is a huge winning edge for us, compared to guys who may not know the system as well.”

Returning career starts at quarterback:

Duke: 16
Florida State: 14
Virginia: 12
Syracuse 10
Miami: 10*
Boston College: 6*
North Carolina: 5
NC State: 3*
Clemson: 0
Georgia Tech: 0
Louisville: 0
Pittsburgh: 0
Virginia Tech: 0
Wake Forest: 0

*-QBs at these schools made their starts while playing for other programs.


Change in W-L record for teams that returned starting quarterbacks in 2013.

Boston College: +5
Miami: +2
Louisville: +1
Virginia Tech: +1
North Carolina: -1
Clemson: No change
Wake Forest: -1


Change in W-L record for teams that started first-time quarterbacks in 2013.

Duke: +4
Florida State: +2
Pitt: +1
Georgia Tech: No change
Syracuse: -1
Virginia: -2
NC State: -4

ACC's lunchtime links

March, 20, 2014
Mar 20
12:00
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I will not call today's games the "second round."

ACC mailblog for Friday

March, 14, 2014
Mar 14
4:00
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The mailbag has returned. Make sure to keep those questions coming so we have enough to fill up this space each week!

Paul in Roanoke, Va., writes: As a lifelong UVA fan, of course I would love to see Mike London turn things around this fall and get the program back to respectability. However, many fellow Wahoo fans seem to think he will not make it past 2014 and have already begun to speculate on who AD Craig Littlepage will target for the next head coach. With Al Golden turning down the Penn State job, his potential return to Charlottesville has become a dream scenario for many fans, and I honestly don't think it seems that far-fetched. His suit-and-tie personality fits in well with UVA, and he had a great deal of success coaching Ahmad Brooks, Chris Canty, and others under Al Groh before taking the Temple job. Given UVA's top-notch facilities, great academics, solid fan base and location near the Hampton Roads recruiting hotbed, it seems to be a desirable location for someone who already has a history of winning there. And an intra-conference coaching move isn't unprecedented given that Tom O'Brien did it when he moved from BC to NC State. Do you think there is any chance at all that Golden could be lured away by the Wahoos, or do you think he will call Coral Gables home for the foreseeable future?

Andrea Adelson writes: Paul, I appreciate the question, but I cannot speculate about two men still employed as head coaches. I completely understand your concerns about Mike London, given what has happened the past few seasons. And I completely understand the coaching connection between the school and Golden, who has done a solid job at both Temple and Miami. I have no idea what the future holds for either coach. Golden has drawn interest from Wisconsin and Penn State (his alma mater) the last two seasons and stayed with the Canes. Does that mean he is in Coral Gables for the long term? Only time will tell. As for London, he absolutely has to get the ship righted as quickly as possible. He signed a terrific class in February, so I want to see what he does with these incoming players and a second year with his coordinators in place.


Tony Milano in Marco Island, Fla., writes: Andrea, I have not read anything about the defense at Boston College. Can you tell me how it is doing?

Adelson writes: BC has only had three practices so far, Tony, so you have not missed out on many big updates. In talking to coach Steve Addazio before practice began, I know he was really pumped about Josh Keyes at linebacker, and the return of just about everybody in the secondary. That remains a huge area that has to improve headed into next season. BC ranked last in pass defense and wore down as the season went on. This will be a much more veteran group in 2014, and Addazio believes that will translate to better results on the field.


Ethan in N.Y., writes: While the Hokies haven't exactly been spectacular these past two seasons, they have still been major contenders in the Coastal Division. In 2012, they were 55 seconds away from beating No. 10 FSU and were still a contender in November. In 2013, they were one North Carolina victory away from playing in Charlotte. Whether this pays tribute to the Hokies or shows how bad the Coastal has been the past two seasons, I don't know. This just tells you to never count out the Hokies. I pick them behind UNC to finish second in the Coastal in 2014, but they could easily win it, or be fifth. Where do you see them finishing in the murky pool of chaos that is the ACC Coastal Division?

Adelson writes: Great question, Ethan. The Coastal has been muddled the past two seasons, and I do not think 2014 is going to be much of an exception. I could legitimately make the case for six teams to win the division this fall. While I believe North Carolina and Duke are the top two at this point, if Virginia Tech can solve its offensive issues, the Hokies absolutely will be in the mix. I also think Pitt could have a great shot as a darkhorse, given some of the players it returns to the team. The Panthers have more talent at the skill positions than the Hokies do headed into the spring. Miami, with a healthy Duke Johnson, cannot be counted out. And Georgia Tech always hangs around the Coastal race. I am happy I don't have to slot my teams in 1-7 until July!


Gil Torres in Mobile, Ala., writes: With Bobby Petrino going to Louisville, how long do you think it will take him to compete for the ACC championship and possibly competing with SEC? Thanks in advance for your answer.

Adelson writes: Gil, given how much of a head start Clemson and Florida State have on him, it is going to take at least a few years for the Cards to compete for an ACC championship. I think they will win their fair share of games, but they need some excellent cycles on the recruiting side to begin building the consistent talent and depth we have seen from their two biggest Atlantic foes.


John in Arlington, Va., writes: Hi Andrea, Big fan of the blog and read it just about every day. I was just wondering why we keep getting updates about Jameis Winston's baseball career? I understand he's the most well-known player in the ACC, and it's the slow time of the year for a college football blog, but this is just that, a college football blog. If I wanted information on how well he's doing in baseball, I would follow college baseball. Just saw a link to "Winston's easy ninth inning", which fueled this rant. Other than that, keep up the good work and thanks for all you do.

Adelson writes: Thanks for reading, John. I think what Winston is doing with baseball is completely relevant and totally fascinating. Players as skilled as Winston have been told for years they had to pick one sport over another. This is the rare exception when he is not only allowed to do both, but excels at both. I understand how all the Winston mania may be getting a little bit old for some people. But his status as the Heisman Trophy winner on the No. 1 team in America makes his baseball career worth following. Especially if it ends up impacting what happens on the football field.

(*Target totals courtesy ESPN Stats & Info.)

Much has been made about the enormous turnover at quarterback in the ACC, where nine of the league’s 14 teams will feature a different starter in Week 1 of 2014 than at the conclusion of 2013.

The new arms throwing the football will be a major storyline for the spring, but the players on the other end of those passes will be much different this year, too. Eight of the top 12 receivers in the ACC last season are moving on, including likely first-round NFL draft picks Sammy Watkins, Eric Ebron and Kelvin Benjamin.

[+] EnlargeTyler Boyd
Charles LeClaire/USA TODAY SportsPittsburgh's Tyler Boyd could be one of the ACC's top wideouts in 2014.
Combine the high turnover at quarterback with the loss of so many top receivers, and it’s fair to say the passing games in the ACC will look much different in 2014. Of course, that doesn’t mean there isn’t some impressive returning talent. Nine receivers who were targeted at least 70 times last season return.

The obvious standout is Jamison Crowder, who was targeted a whopping 174 times in 2013. Nationally, only Fresno State’s Davante Adams (180 targets) was thrown to more often, according to ESPN Stats & Info. It’s also worth noting that Fresno State had 203 more passing attempts than Duke did. Crowder was on the receiving end of 37 percent of Duke’s passing attempts last season, compared with just 27 percent for Adams. Among ACC receivers, only Boston College’s Alex Amidon accounted for a higher percentage of his team’s throws (41 percent). Given his contributions on special teams, too, there's a case to be made that, aside from Jameis Winston, no player in the ACC means more to his team than Crowder.

It’s worth noting, too, that Duke is one of the five ACC teams with the quarterback position already settled, with Anthony Boone and Brandon Connette both returning for 2014, giving the Blue Devils easily the most tested quarterback-receiver combo in the conference.

Beyond Duke’s established QB/WR combo, Florida State is in good hands with senior Rashad Greene returning for his senior season. In 2013, he was on the receiving end of 27 percent of Winston’s throws, and with Benjamin and Kenny Shaw both gone, Greene’s role figures to only get bigger in 2014.

SportsNation

Who will be the ACC's best receiver in 2014?

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    63%
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    10%
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Discuss (Total votes: 4,023)

Believe it or not, the third-most tested combo in the conference is at Virginia, where QB David Watford returns along with receiver Darius Jennings, who was targeted 78 times last year. Of course, the Virginia passing game was far from effective for much of the season -- and Jennings only hauled in 49 percent of his targets with a paltry 4.3 yards/target average -- but the rapport Watford and Jennings were able to build throughout 2013 offers some hope for the Cavaliers’ offense.

In terms of pure explosiveness, North Carolina could have an interesting combination with Marquise Williams back at quarterback and emerging talent Quinshad Davis at receiver. Davis hauled in an impressive 67 percent of his targets and gained an average of 10.1 yards per target last season, including 10 touchdowns. Of course, he’ll need to prove he’s as effective without Ebron hogging so much of the attention from opposing defenses this year.

Similarly, the ACC will get its introduction to Louisville standout DeVante Parker in 2014. While Parker won't have the luxury of Teddy Bridgewater throwing to him, his numbers last season were immensely impressive. He averaged nearly 11 yards each time he was thrown to, and he hauled in two-thirds of his targets.

While Crowder and Greene represent the cream of the crop for receivers with returning quarterbacks, the player with perhaps the most upside of the group is Tyler Boyd. Pitt might be in search of a new starting quarterback to replace Tom Savage, but few first-year starters will have a weapon as reliable and explosive in the passing game as Pitt has in Boyd. As a true freshman in 2013, Boyd finished third in the conference in targets (behind only Crowder and Watkins), hauled in nearly 70 percent of his targets (tops among returning receivers with at least 70 targets) and his 10 catches of 25 yards or more is second only to Crowder among returning receivers in the conference.

But perhaps the most intriguing names on this list are the trio from Virginia Tech. The Hokies account for one-third of all the ACC’s returning receivers with at least 70 targets, meaning that while Frank Beamer works to find his new quarterback, he’ll have a veteran group of receivers to target. Of course, experience only matters if there’s talent to back it up and that’s the big question in Blacksburg.

Virginia Tech ranked 63rd nationally in passing offense last season, 68th in yards per attempt and 89th in QB rating. While Demitri Knowles, Willie Byrn and Joshua Stanford were all among the ACC’s most targeted receivers, they also hauled in just 56 percent of the balls thrown their way and averaged just 7.9 yards per target. They’ll need to be far more reliable in 2014 with a new QB throwing to them.

Video: ACC's top sophomore RB

March, 13, 2014
Mar 13
2:00
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video

Andrea Adelson talks about sophomore running backs with big opportunities in the ACC this spring.

ACC's lunchtime links

March, 13, 2014
Mar 13
12:00
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Taking questions for the mailbag. Send them along here.
Our series concludes today with Boston College, which is turning to several new faces who need to step up after a successful debut season under Steve Addazio.

Spotlight: QB Tyler Murphy

[+] EnlargeTyler Murphy
AP Photo/Gerald HerbertTyler Murphy started six games at Florida last season.
2013 summary: With Florida last season, Murphy played in nine games and started six, completing 60.5 percent of his passes for 1,216 yards with six touchdowns and five interceptions. He added 61 rushing yards and three more scores on the ground.

The skinny: The Eagles say goodbye to three-year starting quarterback Chase Rettig and in comes Murphy, who enrolled at Boston College early after graduating from Florida. Murphy will be immediately eligible for the 2014 season. Murphy is a much more ideal fit for the Eagles' offense as he is a true dual-threat quarterback who can help stretch the field. He was recruited to the Gators by Addazio when he was a UF assistant under Urban Meyer.

The Eagles have a crowded field vying for the starting spot, as they brought aboard early enrollee Darius Wade, a three-star prospect from Middletown (Del.) High, and also have returnee James Walsh. (Josh Bordner, Rettig's backup the last two seasons, moved to wide receiver.)

But Murphy entered spring practice Wednesday as the only quarterback among the group with game experience, and he has plenty of it. He was just 2-4 last year as a starter on an awful Gators team, but it's not like players transfer for their fifth and final seasons without the intent of getting significant playing time. (Nor do coaches take them for any other reason.) Murphy's seniority, coupled with his familiarity with Addazio and what the coach wants, makes him the guy to keep an eye on throughout the offseason. The Eagles must replace both tackles in front of him, too, so the more veteran savvy, the better for the future leader of the BC offense. It will likely be Murphy's job to lose.

Q&A: BC center Andy Gallik

March, 11, 2014
Mar 11
2:00
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Spring practice is underway at Boston College. The Eagles held one practice just before spring break, then returned to the field Tuesday to resume workouts. I had a chance to catch up with veteran center Andy Gallik after practice to talk about goals for this upcoming season and how the Eagles are going to answer questions at running back and quarterback.

How are things different this spring in Year 2 under Steve Addazio?

Andy Gallik: Last spring, the big thing was understanding Coach Addazio’s philosophy as a whole for the team. This year, despite the many losses we had and being a younger unit, the guys that have been around have stepped up as leaders and it has been a little bit easier of a transition because we’ve already spent over a year in the offensive and defensive schemes that we’ve run. So it’s been a little bit easier transition than we had last springtime.

[+] EnlargeAndy Gallik
Michael Tureski/Icon SMIAndy Gallik says the Eagles will remain a physical, run-first team, and he's excited about the competition at QB to replace Chase Rettig.
Have you stepped up more as a leader?

AG: I feel like it’s a role that I should take over as the center, being a fifth-year guy. I’ve played a lot of football since I’ve been here so I know what it takes to show up in practice and do everything the right way with working and fundamentals from period to period in practice because it transitions over to Saturdays when you’re playing in the games.

How do you duplicate the success you had running the ball last year without Andre Williams?

AG: We definitely have the same mentality of being a tough, physical unit, not just all around but especially up front on the offensive line. We return myself, Bobby Vardaro and Harris Williams and we also return Seth Betancourt at tackle, who has played a lot of ball since he’s been here as well. So even though we lost Andre, we do have a good stable of running backs ready to step in. Everybody knows the mentality we have as an offense, running downhill, being physical, being extremely tough. Everybody has the right mindset going into the spring again.

What was it like changing that mindset to being a physical, tough football team?

AG: The guys in my class when we were recruited, the offensive scheme we were in was centralized around being a tough and physical unit up front, but we got away from that the last couple years with the different offensive coordinators and the type of offense we ran. When Coach Addazio came in, it was something we had done before, but we got away from it a little bit. Coach Addazio not only stressed the toughness but bringing the techniques and really working the fine details of the work that we do.

You have to replace Chase Rettig at quarterback. Now you have players with a different skill set competing to win the starting job. What has that transition been like so far?

AG: It’s definitely a little different because I’ve been with Chase my whole career, but Tyler Murphy comes in from Florida, who has a lot of starting experience in a great conference. Darius Wade is a freshman who has a lot of ability, along with James Walsh. We’ve seen a different dynamic with guys who are more mobile and can run with it. It’s definitely interesting and really exciting to play in this offense now because we have more options to attack defenses.

What have you seen out of the three quarterbacks competing for the job so far during workouts?

AG: They’re all really extremely talented. When I first saw them throwing, we were working out on our own and I saw the arm strength in all these guys and how quick they are and I couldn’t believe all the options we have. So it’s going to be an interesting spring to see the competition grow between all the quarterbacks.

As the center, how is your role impacted with an open quarterback competition?

AG: It’s definitely a different transition working with different guys but in terms of snapping -- snapping stays the same. The competition, it’s not up to me. Everything I do as the center stays status quo but in terms of their playing styles, that’s out of my hands but the chemistry is something that’s going to have to be built throughout spring ball between each of the quarterbacks that I do work with.

What is the mentality among the players this spring, knowing you had success a year ago?

AG: Last year we felt like we fell a little bit short. We did make a bowl game and that was an amazing experience, but all of us wanted to win that bowl game. For us to lose, it left a sour taste in our mouth going into the offseason. Everybody is really hungry. We’re all aiming for an ACC championship, not just going to a bowl game. We want to raise the bar and improve on last year.

ACC's lunchtime links

March, 7, 2014
Mar 7
12:00
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Enjoy the weekend, gang.

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