ACC: Boston College Eagles

Spring football is off and running at several ACC schools, with many more set to kick things off in the coming days and weeks. There is no shortage of storylines throughout the league, but here are the questions that stand out above all else:

1. Does the ACC have an embarrassment of quarterback riches? It's not every day a league can withstand losing a Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback to the pros (more on FSU later), but the ACC has a ton of talent coming back under center in 2015. Georgia Tech, Louisville, Miami, NC State, Pitt, Syracuse, Virginia, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest all return players who started at quarterback in 2014. Thomas Sirk is the frontrunner at Duke, and he saw extended time last year as a change-of-pace quarterback, too. Then there's Clemson and North Carolina, whose talented signal-callers from last fall will miss this spring, giving others a chance to prove themselves and build depth. Which brings us to …

2. What about the No. 2 quarterbacks? Deshaun Watson may be way ahead of schedule in his recovery from ACL surgery, as Dabo Swinney said Friday, and we all know what the sophomore is capable of when he is healthy. But this spring will see others get a chance at Clemson, as last year's No. 3 signal-caller, Nick Schuessler, leads a trio of quarterbacks that includes early enrollees Kelly Bryant and Tucker Israel. At North Carolina, meanwhile, the Tar Heels will have to go through spring drills without starter Marquise Williams, who is sidelined with a hip injury. That means Mitch Trubisky, who split time with Williams in the early part of the 2014 season, will run the first team this spring.

3. How does FSU replace Jameis? More quarterback talk, you say? Why of course! Florida State lost just one game in two years with Jameis Winston as its starter, so replacing him is no easy task. Sean Maguire is back after an uneven performance in his lone start last year, but he will have to battle it out with redshirt freshman J.J. Cosentino, a former ESPN four-star prospect, and early enrollee De'Andre Johnson, another four-star prospect.

[+] EnlargePat Narduzzi
AP Photo/Keith SrakocicPat Narduzzi spent the past eight seasons as Michigan State's defensive coordinator.
4. What does Narduzzi bring to Pitt? There is just one new head coach in the ACC this time around. And, once again, he resides in the Steel City. Pat Narduzzi is the fourth different head coach to open a spring in Pittsburgh since 2010, but he walks into a pretty good situation. The Panthers boast junior studs in James Conner and Tyler Boyd on offense, and Narduzzi's defensive roots should prove valuable to a Panthers unit that struggled down the stretch last season.

5. How will BC's offensive makeover look? Few coaches have had as much early success at new stops as Steve Addazio has had at Boston College, taking a two-win team from 2012 to consecutive 7-6 seasons. In 2013, he rode Heisman finalist running back Andre Williams to a strong finish. In 2014, he relied on dual-threat transfer quarterback Tyler Murphy. This season Addazio promoted receivers coach Todd Fitch to offensive coordinator after Ryan Day left for the Philadelphia Eagles, and he is looking for a more balanced attack. This could be more challenging considering he'll be without a senior signal-caller for the first time.

6. Will early enrollees make an impact? We already mentioned Johnson at FSU, but five-star safety Derwin James could have an easier path to the field, given the Seminoles' openings in the secondary. So, too, could five-star receiver George Campbell. Similar circumstances at North Carolina could allow four-star linebacker Andre Smith to start early, especially on a Tar Heels defense that had a staff makeover and is in need of a massive turnaround from 2014.

7. Can Clemson's defense again be dominant? The Tigers boasted the nation's No. 1 defense last season, but they said goodbye to plenty of talent. Coordinator Brent Venables will have his work cut for him, but bringing back Shaq Lawson, D.J. Reader, Ben Boulware, Mackensie Alexander and Jayron Kearse is certainly a good starting point for a team that appears to be the early league frontrunner in 2015.

8. Will Louisville keep it going defensively? The Cardinals' defense was one of the bigger surprise of 2014, Bobby Petrino's first year back with the program. But all of those playmakers came from the past regime, and Petrino will be counting on transfers with troubled pasts to pitch in this year: former Georgia safety Josh Harvey-Clemons, former Georgia corner Shaq Wiggins and former TCU linebacker Devonte Fields.

9. Can Miami take advantage of the talent at its disposal? Brad Kaaya, Joseph Yearby, Gus Edwards and Stacy Coley give the Hurricanes a great starting point this spring. But Miami likely has to figure out its retooling offensive line in order to take advantage of its weapons. Questions on how this team went 6-7 last year continue to mount, and now will be as good of a time as any for the Canes to get things going and change the conversation.

10. Will Notre Dame get a quarterback answer? The Irish's inaugural year of quasi-ACC membership helped bring us arguably the game of the year, at Florida State. This year the Irish, who return 19 starters, will face six ACC teams, including contests against potential division frontrunners Clemson and Georgia Tech. But who is directing the offense under center will likely be determined this spring, as Everett Golson and Malik Zaire will battle it out after splitting reps in Notre Dame's bowl win over LSU. There is also always the chance that Golson, who said he graduates this spring, could transfer and play his fifth season elsewhere this fall.

ACC morning links

March, 2, 2015
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Spring is more than two weeks away. Spring practices have yet to begin at a number of schools across the country. But in Durham, the main event of spring football has already come and gone.

Duke got an early start on its spring season again this year, hoping to keep the momentum going from another strong campaign this past fall. And if Saturday's scrimmage is any indication, the Blue Devils' defense is ahead of the offense at this point.
“The defense definitely won,” defensive tackle Carlos Wray said, according to the (Raleigh) News & Observer's Laura Keeley. “They got behind the sticks (tackled for loss), they didn’t convert a fourth down, they missed the two-point conversion, which is what we call a game-winner, and the referees deemed that the pass over in the left corner of the end zone was incomplete, which gave us the W."

With construction taking place at Wallace Wade Stadium, Duke had only a 25-minute scrimmage, which followed 90 minutes of drills. And the results could very well turn out to be a pleasant surprise for a team that has won 19 games these past two seasons.

As colleague David Hale wrote last week, defensive line has been the one big missing piece for the Blue Devils these past two seasons. Wray is the only returning starter to the defensive line in 2015, but the continued growth and development of the unit is a positive sign.

Defensive tackle A.J. Wolf was honored as most improved defensive player this spring, sharing the distinction with defensive back Alonzo Saxton II. Offensively, receiver Terrence Alls and tackle Gabe Brander earned the accolades. Corner Jamie Cockey earned the Blue Devil Heart Award.

Saturday was Duke's 11th practice this spring.

Here are the rest of your Monday links:

ACC morning links

February, 27, 2015
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Athlon put together a list of 20 running backs on the rise for 2015, and it’s an ACC-heavy club.

The top 20 includes FSU’s Dalvin Cook, Clemson’s Wayne Gallman, BC’s Jon Hilliman, Virginia’s Taquan Mizzell and Miami’s Joseph Yearby. Georgia Tech’s C.J. Leggett also cracks the “others to watch” list. So that’s six running backs from the conference’s 14 teams, but it’s possible the list could’ve been even longer.

NC State’s combo of Shad Thornton and Matt Dayes was exceptionally good last season. Had their combined stats belonged to just one runner, their 23 touchdowns and 1,934 scrimmage yards would’ve ranked second in the ACC.

North Carolina’s T.J. Logan has been a reflection of his team the past two years -- slow starts followed by strong finishes, but he topped 92 yards in three of his final four games last year, and from Nov. 1 on, 43 percent of his rushes gained at least 5 yards.

Louisville’s Brandon Radcliff had to share the backfield with a trio of other productive runners throughout last season, but he still ran for 12 scores (third in the ACC) and had 22 carries of 10 yards or more, trailing only James Conner of Pittsburgh and Cook among returning ACC runners.

Duke’s Shaun Wilson will likely still share plenty of snaps with Shaq Powell, but no Power 5 back in the nation with at least 75 carries had a higher yards per carry average than the freshman last year.

At Virginia Tech, J.C. Coleman will be No. 1 on the depth chart after a strong finish to the season, but Shai McKenzie and Marshawn Williams both showed flashes of brilliance as true freshmen last year behind a lackluster offensive line.

And since this was an “on the rise” list, it didn’t even include the ACC’s player of the year in Conner.

In other words, the ACC should have a really strong corps of runners next season, and it certainly wouldn’t be out of the question for the league to end up with a half-dozen 1,000-yard backs or more.

A few more links:
It is hard to argue this point about Boston College coach Steve Addazio: He has done one of the best coaching jobs in the ACC over the last two seasons, taking a downtrodden program back to respectability in virtually no time at all.

But that does not necessarily mean that BC has arrived. Just look at last season, when the Eagles lost four games in the fourth quarter or overtime. The Eagles remain a work in progress, a young team headed into 2015 that still must learn how to win while breaking in new starters at two major positions – quarterback and offensive line.

[+] EnlargeSteve Addazio
Michael Shroyer/Getty ImagesSteve Addazio has done an excellent job in two season at BC, and he promises a 'tough, competitive, fundamentally sound' team in 2015.
With spring practice underway, Addazio is not quite sure what this season has in store. But he is confident in his players.

Here, in his own words, Addazio discusses the state of the BC program headed into Year 3:

“We’ve got to take the next step right now. I took a team that was 2-10, we’ve brought the team back to being a tough, hard, fighting competitive football program. We’re recruiting better, and we’re still building. I just graduated five offensive linemen with no juniors or seniors to fill that, so we’re really young. That’s why it’s going to take time to get this completely where we want it to be. We’ve done a really good job. We’ve got a great buzz and a great energy and a great excitement about our program right now. We’re winning and we’re bowl eligible and that’s great.

“But we’ve got to take the next step. This year, we lost three games on either the last play or the last drive of the game, and that would have given us 10 wins. Are we a 10-win team right now? No. In the first couple years, we’re anywhere from a four- to six-win team and we won seven in both of them. This year’s team is a lot like the last two years' teams. We have two recruiting classes in place. Last year, we brought in 32 kids, this year we brought in 26. We’ve got like 58 players who are first- or second-year players, so I love where we are.

“We’re still probably a year away from having a roster complete, so you have starters and backups and you’re balanced in your positions. A year from now, we’ll still be young. It’s all about how long it takes you to develop all these young players, specifically at this quarterback position and offensive line. Those are two beacon lights going off right now. Those are time intensive positions to groom. It’s very difficult to get those guys where they’re going to be in Year 1.

“But we’ve got good players. We’ve increased our team speed unbelievably and we have an unbelievable work ethic and a toughness in our program. There’s no doubt in my mind where we’re headed. When we took this job, I told you this was a four-, five-year deal. We’re ahead of schedule. We were in Year 1 and Year 2. Where does Year 3 go? Honestly I don’t know. It wouldn’t shock me if we were better, it wouldn’t shock me if we weren’t quite as good.

“I think Year 3 is a lot like Year 1 and 2. It could swing either way. But I know this: The right pieces are in place. Now it’s a matter of development and maturation. We’re on our way. We’re going to have a tough football team, a competitive, fundamentally sound football team.

“This is a place where the best can be brought out of guys, and the end result of that is when you multiply that across your whole team, I think you can find a way when you’re rebuilding your whole program to get six and seven and possibly eight wins when people don’t think you will.”
If you're perusing the nonconference schedules for ACC teams in 2015, you've no doubt noticed that Boston College isn't exactly wowing its fan base by signing up for two games against FCS foes. But before you go and point fingers at the Eagles for stacking the decks for two easy wins, BC Interruption goes through the agonizing details of the long, unpleasant journey that led to this slate of games.

Long story short, the ACC's flip-flop on a nine-game schedule two years ago and the ongoing conference reshuffling elsewhere were the biggest dominoes to fall, but when you get into the nitty gritty of it, the saga really underscores just how difficult scheduling has become.

In 2012, Florida State faced a similar problem. West Virginia bailed on a nonconference agreement, and in its place, the Seminoles could do no better than Savannah State -- a game so lopsided, they didn't even finish playing it.

Clemson and Georgia Tech both had multiple FCS foes on their schedules in 2013, and even those late-season rivalries against the SEC probably weren't enough to make matchups against Elon or South Carolina State seem worthwhile. But that's the breaks when the conference changes scheduling tactics at the last minute.

Scheduling has become a brutal business. Teams don't see conference foes often enough in the ACC, SEC and Big Ten. No one wants to lose the revenue of a seventh home game, so slating home-and-homes against anyone becomes tricky. Lower-tier FBS schools know their services as punching bags are in high demand, so they want big bucks in return. Contracts for future games aren't worth much more than the paper they're printed on.

Which brings us to the biggest problem: Scheduling matters a lot in this new playoff era. In fact, scheduling was probably the No. 1 topic of discussion as we all debated who was in and who should be left out. But was it Florida State's fault that Oklahoma State wasn't very good? Should Baylor have been made to suffer for keeping scheduling agreements that were signed long before there was such a thing as a playoff committee? How many people were giving extra credit to Ohio State for losing to Virginia Tech rather than thumping four punching bags like Mississippi State did?

One way around the problems may be to ink more nonconference conference games, as UNC and Wake Forest did, and as the Post & Courier suggests Clemson and South Carolina should also do. But if we're getting to that point, why not just move to that nine-game conference slate that was such a source of frustration two years ago?

What's more realistic in the short term is that the committee -- which includes its share of ADs who should be familiar with these issues -- needs to seriously re-evaluate how much scheduling factors into its rankings.

A few more links:

ACC's most intriguing Nos. 16-20

February, 24, 2015
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We’re still 26 long weeks away from the start of the 2015 season, but there promises to be plenty of twists and turns for ACC teams before the action kicks off. While some of the drama will come as a surprise, there are a number of key figures around the ACC that are already big stories. With that in mind, we’re counting down the 25 most intriguing figures in the conference this offseason -- from players to coaches to administrators -- and digging into the impact they might make on how 2015 unfolds once the games finally begin. Next up, numbers 16 through 20.

16. Devonte Fields

Role: Defensive end, Louisville

[+] EnlargeDevonte Fields
Kevin Jairaj/USA TODAY SportsLouisville hopes that troubled former Big 12 freshman of the year Devonte Fields can provide a pass-rushing spark.
Intrigue: There’s little doubt about Fields’ talent. He recorded 10 sacks in 2012 and was named the Big 12’s defensive freshman of the year. But an arrest on domestic assault charges led to a dismissal from the school, and he spent last season playing for Trinity Valley Junior College. Fields certainly isn’t the first troubled transfer Louisville has taken a chance on, but he might be the most high profile at this point.

Potential impact: Bobby Petrino has asked for plenty of second chances in his own life, so it’s no surprise that he’s been willing to give some to his players, too. Time will tell whether Fields has learned from his past mistakes, but if he can stay out of trouble, he could be an instant impact playmaker as an outside rusher, filling in for the departed Lorenzo Mauldin.

17. Tony Elliott and Jeff Scott

Role: Co-offensive coordinators, Clemson

Intrigue: So much of Clemson’s success the past four years was defined by offensive coordinator Chad Morris, including the arrival of phenom QB Deshaun Watson last season. Watson and Morris had a close relationship, and the young QB knew Morris’ system inside and out. Now Morris is at SMU, and Dabo Swinney chose replacements from in house. Elliott will be calling plays this season, and just how much he plans to tweak the offense from what Morris ran so successfully will be one of the biggest stories to watch in the ACC.

Potential impact: The magic formula for Clemson isn’t much of a mystery: Get Watson healthy, let him make plays. But there’s so much young talent on the Tigers’ offense that Scott and Elliott have to be drooling at the possibilities. While they’ve learned the ropes working under Morris, there’s still a good chance they’ll want to put their own stamp on the offense. Swinney took a bit of a risk replacing one of the highest-paid coordinators in the country with more cost-effective alternatives, but with Watson, Artavis Scott, Mike Williams, Wayne Gallman and others at their disposal, Elliott and Scott are playing with a stacked deck.

18. Kelby Brown

Role: Linebacker, Duke

Intrigue: One of the ACC’s top defenders in 2013, Brown blew out his knee in fall camp last season and missed the entire season. He’s still rehabbing the injury and has been limited in spring practice, but with Duke losing a ton of experience in its front seven, Brown’s recovery might be more crucial than anything that happens on the practice field.

Potential impact: Brown finished 2013 with 114 tackles, including 11 for a loss, and two interceptions to help set the tone for Duke’s D. With a full, healthy season in 2015, he could easily match or exceed those numbers, particularly with fellow linebacker David Helton moving on. Duke’s run defense was the second-worst in the league last season with Brown sidelined, but a return to action could help fill some glaring holes.

19. Steve Addazio

Role: Head coach, Boston College

Intrigue: Addazio has been a magician since arriving in Chestnut Hill. In his first season, he turned the 2-10 Eagles into a bowl team. In his second, he replaced a Heisman finalist tailback, starting QB, his top receiver, pass rusher and tackler and still won seven games. Now, it’s time to revamp once again, with QB Tyler Murphy, LB Josh Keyes and a number of other veterans leaving.

Potential impact: Addazio’s best asset is that he’s been willing to adapt to the players he has. Two years ago, his power run game was his bread and butter. Last year, the option got the job done. So what’s his next trick for 2015? In a division that has seen plenty of talent depart from the top contenders, Addazio has already shown he’s adept at finding solutions.

20. Andrew Brown

Role: Defensive tackle, Virginia

Intrigue: A year ago, UVA signed two five-star defenders. One, Quin Blanding, quickly developed into one of the ACC’s top defenders. The other, Brown, struggled to gain much footing. Now with a year of experience under his belt, the 305-pound defensive lineman has a chance to show he’s made up for lost time by stepping into a much bigger role in 2015.

Potential impact: Injuries hampered Brown early and he never really got going as a true freshman, but there’s still plenty of optimism about his potential impact at UVA. The Cavaliers are losing a trio of talented linebackers, along with star defensive end Eli Harold, which makes Brown’s development on the line crucial to maintaining the strong pass rush and run-stuffing capability they showed a year ago. He arrived with the size and the talent to make it happen. If he's also learned from his year waiting in the wings, he could easily emerge as the ACC's next big star on D.
When Dave Clawson took the head-coaching job at Wake Forest last year, he knew it would be a massive rebuilding project Insider. His roster lacked any experienced talent at the offensive skill positions. His offensive line was woefully undersized. His recruiting base was dominated by bigger schools, spending more money. There was, he believed, a plan to turn Wake into a winner, but it would be a long and treacherous road. When the Demon Deacons finished 1-7 in ACC play in 2014, most chalked it up as a surprisingly successful first step.

When Jimbo Fisher took over for legendary Bobby Bowden at Florida State in 2010, the path to rebuilding a winner wasn’t nearly as tough. The Seminoles had tradition and money and a passionate alumni base, and once Fisher got the right staff in place he made an instant impact on the recruiting trail and won a division title in his first season. Still, by the time he finished the 2012 campaign with FSU’s first ACC championship in seven years, a vocal contingent of the fan base remained dubious that Fisher was the right man for the job. They’d hoped for more, and a 12-2 record was labeled something of a disappointment.

[+] EnlargeDave Clawson
John David Mercer/USA TODAY SportsIs Dave Clawson's job at Wake Forest tougher than Jimbo Fisher's at Florida State? Depends on your perspective.
Pinpointing the toughest coaching job in the ACC is really a matter of semantics. At Wake, resources are thin but expectations are modest. A coach gets time to build. At Florida State, there are ample tools to create a juggernaut, but the fan base doesn’t accept excuses when winning doesn’t come quickly. The difficulty of the job is really in the eye of the beholder.

Of course, there’s plenty of room for debate between those two counterpoints, too.

David Cutcliffe took over a Duke program that had spent the previous 15 years as one of the worst teams in the FBS, but he slowly rebuilt the on-field product, pushed for more investment and led the charge for stadium upgrades and now the Blue Devils have played in three straight bowl games. What was once universally considered one of the toughest jobs in college football now looks like a pretty cushy gig.

At Miami, Al Golden is living the alternate side of that story. The Hurricanes were a powerhouse for two decades, but, after an extended dry spell marred by an NCAA investigation, piecing together a consistent winner at Miami has proved to be an arduous project. The Canes have brought in talent, including potentially three first-round picks in the upcoming NFL draft, but Golden has just a .500 record in ACC play to show for it, and the fan base is understandably restless.

Places such as Syracuse and Boston College have rich football traditions, but geography makes recruiting a tougher task. North Carolina and Virginia have resources and more fertile recruiting bases, but they’ve combined for just three ACC titles since 1980, and none in the past 20 years.

Deciding on the ACC’s toughest job is really about where the line between expectations and opportunity converge. At places such as Wake and Syracuse, no doubt more legwork is required to simply get to a bowl game. At Florida State and Miami, finding the talent is easy but meeting the lofty expectations that come with it can be a challenge.

It’s fair to say most coaches would prefer the latter problem, of course, and there’s a reason FSU is a destination job while Syracuse is more likely a place to get fired or a steppingstone to a better gig. But sometimes it’s simply about finding the right fit. Cutcliffe has said he hopes never to leave Duke -- a job most coaches would’ve run from screaming a decade ago. Meanwhile, Dabo Swinney has led Clemson to four straight 10-win seasons, but when he was rumored to be a candidate for the Florida job in December, he didn’t deny he might someday move on from Death Valley for the right opportunity elsewhere. The best jobs are often a matter of perspective, too.

In the end, a great coach finds a way to mine for resources, even in less fertile areas. He wins enough that expectations climb, even in places where winning had been an afterthought for years. At Virginia Tech, Frank Beamer is an institution -- the man responsible for building the program over the course of three decades. That success helped him snag a top-25 recruiting class this year, and it also has the fan base up in arms after three straight subpar seasons.

In other words, it’s not as much about the job as it is about the coach. Clawson hasn’t shied away from the task at hand. Instead, he has embraced the difficulty of winning at Wake Forest. And one year after Fisher was criticized for failing to meet expectations in 2012, he won a national title at Florida State with one of the most dominant teams in recent history.

Every job has its challenges, but the right coach finds a way to meet them regardless.

ACC morning links

February, 23, 2015
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Over the last five NFL drafts, the ACC has the second-most picks (169), second only to the SEC. Based on the showings of several players from the ACC at the NFL combine over the weekend, the conference has a chance at a half-dozen first-round picks in 2015, if not more.

Former Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston was the most anticipated combine participant from the ACC since, well, last year. The 2013 Heisman Trophy winner opened his news conference with reporters admitting he made mistakes at FSU, but he reportedly impressed several teams during his interviews -- with both his answers to questions about his past and his football intellect in whiteboard sessions. It's hardly a surprise Winston excelled, as he has lost a public speaking engagement about as often as he lost games.

Winston was spectacular as a passer Insider and left no doubt his skill set translates well to the NFL.

While Winston stole the headlines, there were several other former ACC stars who improved their draft stocks as well. Former Clemson defensive end/linebacker Vic Beasley was the big winner Sunday, putting together one of the best performances for a linebacker. There has been talk that Beasley is a fringe NFL defensive end and fringe NFL linebacker. Beasley added weight and measured at 246 pounds, but he did it while keeping his athleticism and speed. He ran a 4.53 40-yard dash and benched 225 pounds 35 times, which were tops among both defensive linemen and linebackers. According to Clemson's athletic department, no linebacker has done that since NFL.com began listing combine results in 2006.

Former Virginia defensive end Eli Harold, like Beasley, is looked at as a hybrid, too. He posted a 4.60 in the 40-yard dash. Mario Edwards Jr., formerly of Florida State, showed he could also play two positions: defensive end and defensive tackle.

The 6-foot-3, 209-pound DeVante Parker, formerly of Louisville, made a case to be the top receiver taken with a 4.45 in the 40-yard dash.

Once again, Apr. 30 could be a solid showing for the ACC.

Here are a few more links for your Monday.
Before Steve Addazio arrived at Boston College, the Eagles went through a revolving door of offensive coordinators.

So when Ryan Day left for the Philadelphia Eagles last month, the last thing Addazio wanted to do was make wholesale changes at that particular spot. So he promoted receivers coach Todd Fitch to offensive coordinator, believing the move to be as seamless a transition as possible.

“I didn’t want someone to come in here and start over again,” Addazio said in a recent phone interview. “It’s been a developed path we’ve been on, so I wanted to make sure we had continuity. I felt our players and our team needed continuity. One of the raps here was -- I forgot how many coordinators they had here over the last six years. That’s unnecessary given the fact that I’m extremely involved in everything that happens on a day to day basis on offense.

[+] EnlargeTodd Fitch
Chris Williams/Icon SportswireOne of the biggest challenges for new offensive coordinator Todd Fitch will be breaking in a new starting quarterback.
“Todd had been a very successful coordinator, and I’ve worked with him now for two years. I’m very comfortable with Todd. He’s an experienced, veteran playcaller, has a great, even temperament and is a sharp guy, so I thought that was just a match.”

The two had never worked together until Addazio hired him at Boston College in 2013, but Fitch came with great references. He worked previously with Urban Meyer, Dan McCarney and Charlie Strong -- all good friends with Addazio. Fitch even served in Meyer’s wedding.

He has plenty of coordinator experience, having served in the same role at USF, East Carolina and UConn. The fundamental principles behind the BC offense will not change. But that does not mean the Eagles will look the same in 2015.

The biggest emphasis in the spring will be on the throwing game, an area that BC has not had much success. With Andre Williams leading the rushing charge in 2013, BC ranked No. 13 in passing offense. With dual-threat quarterback Tyler Murphy leading the way last season, BC ranked last in passing offense. The Eagles attempted only 243 passes, compared to 635 rushing attempts.

Now, that does not mean BC is going to move away from rushing the ball. The Eagles still plan on being a physical, aggressive run team. But Addazio is hoping for a little more balance to his offense, especially with quarterbacks capable of slinging the ball downfield.

Darius Wade, Troy Flutie and early enrollee Elijah Robinson will share the reps this spring in an open quarterback competition. Wade served as the backup last year, but he only attempted eight passes and had two rushes. All three will get a look to win the starting job.

“We think all our quarterbacks have really good throwing capability,” Addazio said. “We’re going to spend a lot of time to develop third down and to enhance our first- and second-down throws. That’s a focal point for sure. …

“We’ll always be heavy run, but Darius can flat out throw the ball and we’ve got some receivers now, so we really feel like this is the time to try and develop that piece of the game. As I told the offense, when we go winner/loser, I’m going to say, ‘OK, we’re going to move the ball today by just throwing it. Here we go, get it done.’”

Addazio, however, faces a different challenge with his offense headed into this season -- he does not have a veteran quarterback. Nor does he have a seasoned offensive line. With Rettig and Murphy he had seniors. Whomever wins the starting quarterback job will be making his first career start in the season opener.

“We’re going to have our challenges,” Addazio said. “There’s going to be some real hurdles along the way both at quarterback and the line position this year. But whatever they are, everything we put in is like putting into an annuity in the bank. We’re going to get it all back again. How much are we going to get back this season? I don’t know, but I know between this season, next season and the season after, we’re going to get it all back. And that’s when you start to have a real good program.”
Is February the new March?

Perhaps it is in the ACC.

Four league teams have opted to open spring football practice this month, more than any other Power 5 conference. That number is double what it was a year ago, when Duke and Boston College opted to start in February.

Miami and Syracuse decided to join them this year. The Hurricanes opened Tuesday while Syracuse made the most dramatic change, moving its first spring practice up three weeks. The Orange open Sunday thanks in large part to their newly completed indoor facility.

[+] EnlargeSteve Addazio
John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe/Getty ImagesSteve Addazio and Boston College are enjoying the benefits of starting spring practice earlier.
Why the shift? For one, it helps teams get a jump on their evaluations. It also allows for injured players a little longer time to heal before the season while lengthening the offseason strength and conditioning program.

Duke coach David Cutcliffe shifted to an early February spring practice start date last year, hoping to capitalize on momentum from its bowl performance. It worked out so well for his team that he has no plans to go back.

Boston College starts Feb. 25 with one practice, then resumes in March after spring break, the same schedule coach Steve Addazio used last year. Addazio wanted to practice a few more days in February this year, but could not alter the schedule after he had to make several coaching hires this month.

Still, the one-day February practice is beneficial because it builds in more time spent working on the team.

“The reason I love it is because I want to have as much time post-spring until the start of the season so if you get an injury, you can get a guy back,” Addazio said. “My whole thing is I want to get spring ball in, I want to see where our team is and really figure out what we’re all about.”

Then there are the recruiting considerations, also a big factor in the earlier start dates.

“Our biggest recruiting time is then,” Addazio said. “We get our recruits to come through during practice, and I love it, they get here and we spend a lot of time with them, that’s where we build our bonds. That’s the early bite that we get, and that’s critical to our recruiting. The earlier our spring practice is, the faster we get a bite into our players.”

Earlier spring practices also allow teams to figure out what positions they need to target on the recruiting trail earlier.

“In years past, we were trying to evaluate our spring practice and our depth chart and recruit at the same time,” Syracuse coach Scott Shafer said. “Now, we’re going to be able to say, ‘Let’s take the first week after spring ball, reevaluate everything we did during the spring, what was good, what wasn’t as good as we needed it to be and then close that chapter and jump full steam ahead into the recruiting process,’ which will help us be a little bit more on targets with who we need to go after. That is another area that’s going to be helpful in our process.”

More teams might follow suit in the near future. Second-year Wake Forest coach Dave Clawson also moved spring practice up three weeks to March 3 now that he is firmly in place with the Demon Deacons and not scrambling around in the first few months of the job.

Clawson said he would consider moving practice into late February next year once the new indoor practice facility is completed.

“When we had our spring game last year the third week in April, our coaches weren’t on the road until early May, and so other coaches in our division who had earlier spring football were out recruiting two weeks before we were, and in a day and age in which kids are committing earlier and earlier and changing their mind later and later, it was a recruiting disadvantage for us to not get out,” Clawson said. “We’d be out evaluating a kid and another school had been there twice before we even saw him.”

For staffs without much coaching turnover, the advantages are there. Makes spring football take on a slightly different meaning.

Spring start dates across the ACC

Duke, Miami already started
Feb. 22: Syracuse
Feb. 25: Boston College
March 1: North Carolina, NC State
March 2: Clemson
March 3: Wake Forest
March 15: Pittsburgh
March 17: Virginia
March 23: Georgia Tech
March 24: Virginia Tech, Louisville
TBA: Florida State

Spring reset: ACC quarterback

February, 17, 2015
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This could be the year of the quarterback in the ACC with starters returning at the majority of schools across the league.

But there are some programs that will have a bit of intrigue at the quarterback spot this spring. Here is a quick spring reset at where the signal-callers stand at each ACC school.

The incumbents
The skinny: These six are the unquestioned starters at their respective schools. Even Lambert, marking the first time in five springs Virginia has a set quarterback headed into the spring. Though Matt Johns is sure to get a look, Lambert is expected to start the season if healthy. Same goes for the other five, who appear to have a stronghold on their respective starting jobs.

[+] EnlargeDeshaun Watson
AP Photo/Rainier EhrhardtThe backup quarterback position is key to watch during Clemson's spring practices as Deshaun Watson sits out to rehab his injured knee.
The injured incumbent
The skinny: With Watson out during spring practice while he rehabs a knee injury, true freshmen Kelly Bryant and Tucker Israel will get reps with Nick Schuessler as they compete to become the backup to Watson. Schuessler, a former walk-on, was the No. 3 quarterback last season. Bryant and Tucker enrolled early and are in for spring, great news for a program that has faced depth issues at the position since last fall. The backup job is an important one at Clemson, with Watson coming off a major knee injury. Whomever wins the backup job could be pressed into action early.

The returning starters*
The skinny: Why an asterisk? There is a chance some of these players end up losing their starting job if the competition is fierce enough during the spring and into the fall. All three go into the spring as the starter. They each are the most experienced quarterbacks on their respective rosters. But ...

At Syracuse, Hunt is coming off a broken leg and will face competition from AJ Long and Austin Wilson. Long and Wilson both played last season after Hunt went out, giving the coaching staff much more to work with this spring.

At Wake Forest, coach Dave Clawson said Wolford will get the first-team reps but his quarterback will have to win the starting job again after the Deacs signed two highly touted prep quarterbacks -- Kendall Hinton and Kyle Kearns.

At Pitt, Voytik will have to learn a new system and face new competition from Tennessee transfer Nathan Peterman. While Voytik is expected to keep his starting job, there are no guarantees here, either.

The new starter
The skinny: Sirk has taken first-team reps so far this spring as he works to replace two-year starter Anthony Boone. Parker Boehme and Nico Pierre have provided competition but coach David Cutcliffe has already declared Sirk the starter.

The open competitions

[+] EnlargeSean Maguire
Ronald Martinez/Getty ImagesSean Maguire will enter the spring practice session as the backup QB with the most experience at FSU.
Boston College: Darius Wade, Troy Flutie. Wade is the favorite to win the starting job, but Flutie is expected to get a fair shake. This is what coach Steve Addazio had to say about both during his signing day news conference: "Darius Wade has got a great arm and he throws the ball extremely well. Troy Flutie is a great anticipator, which is a unique quality to have as a quarterback. He does a great job anticipating guys coming out of their breaks. He doesn't have to see them open. So both of those guys have unique tools and both are very athletic."

Florida State: Sean Maguire, J.J. Cosentino. One of the most anticipated competitions in the entire country will take place in Tallahassee, where Jimbo Fisher must replace Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston. Maguire served as the backup last season, but that does not necessarily make him the favorite to win the job. Cosentino came in last year as an ESPN 300 prospect and redshirted. Fisher said true freshmen De'Andre Johnson and Deondre Francois -- both ESPN 300 players -- will also get a shot. Johnson is already in for spring.

Louisville: Reggie Bonnafon, Tyler Ferguson, Kyle Bolin. With Will Gardner out for spring and no timetable set for his return after another major knee injury, the Cardinals are expected to have a heated open competition in the spring between Bonnafon, Ferguson and Bolin. Bonnafon played as a true freshman last season and showed some promise before getting injured late in the year. Bolin was then forced to play with Bonnafon and Gardner out. Though he led a comeback win over Kentucky, he was not nearly as effective in the bowl game against Georgia. Ferguson transferred from Penn State and sat out last season, and could end up being the wild card in the group.

ACC morning links

February, 16, 2015
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A pair of ACC staffs underwent a reshuffling this weekend, as Boston College and Virginia divvied up duties with spring practices approaching.

BC promoted Todd Fitch to offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach, and hired Brian White to replace Fitch as its receivers coach. White spent the last six years at Florida, most recently coaching running backs.

UVa, meanwhile, announced that associate head coach for defense/defensive coordinator Jon Tenuta will coach safeties, while Mike Archer will move from safeties to linebackers and be promoted to associate head coach. Volunteer assistant Brian Wetzel was named a graduate assistant as well.

“In making my evaluations of the program since the end of last season and discussing this with the coaching staff, we all felt these moves would benefit our defense, particularly with the makeup of the returning players,” Cavaliers coach Mike London said in a release. “It also benefits our program by placing Jon and Mike with position groups they have spent the majority of their careers coaching.”

The Hoos had previously hired Chris Beatty (running backs) and Dave Borbely (offensive line). Larry Lewis moved from running backs to tight ends and will continue coordinating special teams.

At BC, Fitch succeeds Ryan Day, who left for the Philadelphia Eagles. White, a Massachusetts native, had coached with Steve Addazio and Justin Frye for two years with the Gators.

"I am very excited to promote Todd as our quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator," Addazio said in a release. "Trust and continuity are two very important factors that went into my decision. It is my belief that our program needs to continue to grow and develop within the same system, continue to improve the areas of strength and to attack the areas that need improvement. I have always had great involvement in the offense and will continue to do so. Therefore, it is extremely important for me to be on the same page as the rest of the offensive coaches. With Todd's leadership and tremendous experience as an offensive coordinator in three different coaching stops, I am confident that he will help us continue to develop and bring us to new heights."

Here are the rest of your Monday links:
The ACC bucked the odds this offseason, with just one program changing head coaches -- and that one came because Paul Chryst landed a better gig at Wisconsin. In other words, none of the league's 14 coaches were axed, which is really an accomplishment.

Football Scoop looks at the tenure of each FBS head coach, and it’s noteworthy that 15 of the 128 schools have hired new coaches in the last three months, and 82 of them have hired a new head coach in the last three years. Just 36 coaches in the country will be entering Year 6 at the same school in 2015, and six of them are in the ACC.

Here’s the conference breakdown on FBS coaches who have survived beyond five years:

ACC: 6
SEC: 6
Big 12: 6
Conference USA: 5
Big 10: 3
Independent: 3
American: 2
Sun Belt: 2
Pac 12: 1
MAC: 1
Mountain West: 1

(*Coaches whose teams have switched leagues since being hired are listed in their current conference)

The Roanoke Times puts the tenure of Virginia Tech coach Frank Beamer in graph form, and it’s pretty jarring.

Beamer was hired to coach the Hokies in 1986. The next longest-tenured coaches were hired 12 years later. Twelve! And he’s one of just three coaches that were hired in the 20th century.

Of course, Beamer’s job security is a growing concern in Blacksburg, but he’s not the only ACC coach with pressure building.

The Times’ graph reveals something pretty interesting: Current coaching tenures peak at three years, with a relatively stark drop-off after that and a huge drop-off after Year 5.

It used to be that five-year plans were the norm for coaches. It gave them a year to take stock of a program and four years to get recruits through the ringer. But these days, three years is more of the status quo, with the pressure being ratcheted up big time in Year 4. Year 5 is essentially do-or-die.

And that brings us to our ACC hot seats.

Chryst would’ve been entering his fourth season, and while he brought some talent into Pitt, he didn’t exactly reinvigorate the program. He may have been wise to get while the getting was good.

Larry Fedora is in Year 4 at North Carolina, and his tenure has been a mixed bag. He’s gotten the Heels off to a brutal start in each of the last two years, and his 2014 defense was abysmal. He brought in Gene Chizik to fix those problems this year, but another 6-6 regular season for UNC — even with the NCAA investigation ongoing — could be a big problem.

At Miami, Al Golden is in Year 5, and he’s trending in the wrong direction. Yes, Miami has weathered the NCAA storm, but after a 20-11 start to his career, Miami is just 8-11 in its last 19 games, and fans are growing frustrated.

In other words, patience is thinner than it’s ever been in college football, and while the ACC has largely bucked that trend with Beamer, Dabo Swinney, Paul Johnson, Mike London, Jimbo Fisher and David Cutcliffe — all on the job more than five years now — no one is immune to the changing landscape.

A few more links:
  • Football Scoop also has a story on coaches looking to do away with signing day altogether, with Georgia Tech’s Paul Johnson helping to lead the charge.
  • Bleacher Report has a story on the emergence of “free agency” in college football, with former FSU QB Jacob Coker highlighted. ESPN’s Andrea Adelson looked at a few transfers poised to make an impact in the ACC this coming season.
  • Former FSU quarterback Jameis Winston is Mel Kiper’s No. 1 overall pick in his latest mock draft, with seven other ACC players going in the first round — including three from Miami.
  • Rick Trickett has his work cut out for him in rebuilding Florida State’s O line this year, but the Tallahassee Democrat writes that he’s already built the relationships to make it happen.
  • David Cutcliffe is searching for playmakers on both sides of the line of scrimmage, writes the Charlotte Observer.
  • Matt Colburn calls his chance to play at Wake Forest “a blessing” after being spurned by Louisville, writes The State.
  • Boston College is stealing a bit from our favorite sports doc series for its online recruiting, writes BC Interruption.
  • Syracuse.com discusses whether it’s smart to install Terrel Hunt, once again, as the Orange’s starting quarterback. As we noted in our quarterback column this week though, it’s not as though any of his back ups offered much reason for change in 2014.
  • Georgia Tech got its first commitment for 2016, as From the Rumble Seat notes.
  • Former Maryland head coach and ACC coach of the year, Ralph Friedgen, has stepped down as Rutgers’ offensive coordinator, writes USA Today.

 
Duke linebacker David Helton was named the winner of the 2014 Jim Tatum Award as the ACC’s top scholar-athlete Wednesday, and the senior was one of 65 players named to the conference’s All-ACC Academic football team.

Helton, who was also an Academic All-American, was joined by Duke teammates Laken Tomlinson and Jeremy Cash, who were both named to All-America teams for their on-field performance as well. Overall, Duke had 13 players earn All-ACC Academic honors, more than any other team in the league. Syracuse had nine, Pitt had eight and Wake Forest had six players.

To be eligible for the ACC’s All-ACC Academic team, a player must have earned a 3.0 GPA or better in the previous academic semester and maintained a 3.0 average over the course their academic career. Overall 128 players were nominated, with 65 winners announced Wednesday. The ACC has selected an All-ACC Academic Football team every year since 1954.

Among the notables on the team were Boston College QB Tyler Murphy, who was one of 12 players to have also earned their undergraduate degree. Clemson receiver Artavis Scott was a Freshman All-American and also earned All-ACC Academic honors. He was joined by fellow freshmen Deshaun Watson, Bo Hines, Shaun Wilson and Travis Rudolph.

Fifteen members of this year’s All-ACC Academic team were repeat winners, including Duke’s DeVon Edwards and Josh Snead, NC State’s Jack Tocho, Pitt’s Ray Vinopal, Wake’s Ryan Janvion and Clemson’s Daniel Rodriguez.

You can view the full roster of All-ACC Academic winners here.

ACC morning links

February, 5, 2015
Feb 5
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The ACC has often been called the worst of the Power 5 conferences, and whether it’s fact or fiction is up for debate (the Big 12 wasn’t all that great, either). However, the conference as a whole set itself up for future accolades with a pretty strong signing day Wednesday.

At least on the recruiting trail, no conference is catching up to the SEC, which has 12 of its 14 teams ranked in the top 25 of RecruitingNation’s class rankings. But guess which conference was right behind the SEC? That would be the same conference that consistently produces the second-most NFL draft picks.

Five ACC teams finished in the top 25 of the class rankings, two more than the Pac-12 and three more than the Big Ten and Big 12. The ACC and SEC both had two teams finish in the top 5 of the rankings, too, and the ACC tied the Pac-12 with the second-most ESPN 300 recruits (47).

To make a splash on the national level, a program has to have the horses capable of running with the lead pack. If the recruiting rankings are any indication -- and they’re usually a decent barometer -- the ACC is stocking its stable.

Florida State finished No. 2 behind Alabama, giving Jimbo Fisher a top-three class for the fourth time in five years. Clemson finished fourth. Miami came in at No. 23, and North Carolina and Virginia Tech rounded out the top 25.

Those last three programs have also underachieved the past few years, though. Miami and North Carolina have been under the NCAA microscope in recent years, and neither has been able to realize its potential over the past decade. Virginia Tech is no longer the consistent 10-win program it once was under Frank Beamer. For the ACC to flip the narrative, the programs in the tier directly beneath Florida State and Clemson need to generate more wins. The Seminoles and Tigers cannot keep waving the ACC banner by themselves.

Georgia Tech gave their arms a rest this past season, and the Yellow Jackets had possibly its best class under Paul Johnson in 2015. The Yellow Jackets spent most of signing day in the top 40 before being bumped late, but they could grow roots in the ACC’s top tier with Justin Thomas returning, a strong freshman class and early positive returns for future recruiting classes.

Newcomer Louisville added a top-five junior college player and two ESPN 300 recruits, and even NC State is shaping up to be a consistent bowl program after elevating its in-state recruiting efforts under Dave Doeren. The Wolfpack signed three of the top seven ESPN 300 recruits from North Carolina, including former FSU pledge Johnny Frasier.

With the 2015 recruiting hauls from those programs, there’s the promise the teams beneath FSU and Clemson can start working their way into national relevancy and the top 25 of the rankings that truly matter. Signing day has offered renewed promise, and it’s time for the ACC to capitalize.
  • No coach ever has a perfect recruiting class, but Boston College coach Steve Addazio feels the Eagles won more battles than they lost in 2015. Addazio has turned BC into a threat on the recruiting trail the past few cycles.
  • Clemson was used to winning on the recruiting trail, but now that the Tigers are winning on the field, the recruiting has reached an entirely new level.
  • Duke finalized its football staff the same day the Blue Devils finalized their 17-man recruit class.
  • Five things that can be taken away from Florida State's second-ranked recruiting haul.
  • And here's four takeaways from Georgia Tech's class, which is one of the better ones Paul Johnson has put together.
  • Louisville signed quarterback Lamar Jackson, who now officially throws his name into the hat for the Cardinals' starting job. He joins three players who all started at least one game last season as well as transfer Tyler Ferguson.
  • Miami could be one of the losers from signing day 2015, but it's time to maybe give Al Golden the benefit of the doubt and let this class develop before making any judgments.
  • North Carolina finished with a top-25 class in the face of an "all-time high" in negative recruiting against UNC, coach Larry Fedora said. Fedora, coming off a 6-7 season, said one rival coach spent an entire visit to one high school trashing the Tar Heels.
  • NC State coach Dave Doeren is making good on his promise to sign the state's top talent.
  • Pittsburgh won't have a highly rated class, but first-year coach Pat Narduzzi can take pride in landing top local talent Jordan Whitehead. The Panthers won't be able to compete in the ACC if it allows blue-chip prospects from western Pennsylvania to leave the area en masse.
  • How does Syracuse's class stack up with the rest of the conference?
  • Virginia had an unprecedented recruiting haul in 2014 with two five-star signees. The 2015 class has a different feel as it's built on prospects who still feel they have a lot to prove.
  • Virginia Tech is loading up on both the offensive and defensive line with the 2015 class.
  • Wake Forest coach Dave Clawsen focused on offensive skill players this signing day.

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