Winston suspended for half versus Clemson

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
12:03
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Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston has been suspended for the first half of Saturday's game against Clemson after he was seen shouting an obscene sexual phrase on campus Tuesday.

FSU interim president Dr. Garnett S. Stokes and athletics director Stan Wilcox issued the statement Wednesday announcing the punishment.

As the university's most visible ambassadors, student-athletes at Florida State are expected to uphold at all times high standards of integrity and behavior that reflect well upon themselves, their families, coaches, teammates, the Department of Athletics and Florida State University. Student-athletes are expected to act in a way that reflects dignity and respect for others.

"It was not a good decision," coach Jimbo Fisher said of the incident during Wednesday's ACC teleconference. "You can't make certain statements that are derogatory or inflammatory to any person, race or gender. You have to understand that. You have to be very intelligent about what you say, (because) it matters."

To read the full story, click here.
Nebraska and Miami met five times in bowl games from 1984 to 2002, with the winner staking claim to the national title four times. Here’s a look inside the series at three of the most memorable games from an era gone past in college football:

1984 Orange Bowl: Miami 31, Nebraska 30


Turner Gill, Kevin FaganAP Photo/John RaouxKevin Fagan hounded Turner Gill in the '84 Orange Bowl as Miami won its first national title.


December 1983 rated as one of the coldest months on record in Lincoln, Nebraska.

The high temperature was 36 degrees on Dec. 8. The low? Minus-24 on Dec. 22, part of a weeklong stretch when the thermometer did not reach zero while the top-ranked Cornhuskers readied to play Miami in the Orange Bowl.

At the time, Nebraska practiced outdoors on frozen grass and AstroTurf. Four years later, the school built an indoor facility, spurred in part by the horrendous conditions of that month. When the Huskers arrived in Miami, players and coaches exited the plane in their winter coats. The heat and humidity hit them hard -– which was a factor as the Hurricanes jumped to a 17-0 lead on Jan. 2.

The 1983 Huskers averaged 50.3 points and 370.8 rushing yards per game behind quarterback Turner Gill and Heisman Trophy-winning I-back Mike Rozier. But in that Orange Bowl, Nebraska sputtered offensively as Rozier left in the second half with an ankle injury.

The Huskers pulled within one, but Gill’s two-point conversion pass failed in the final minute as Kenny Calhoun knocked the ball away from Nebraska I-back Jeff Smith.

The whole scenario couldn’t have worked any better for Howard Schnellenberger, the Hurricanes’ showman of a head coach who, in buildup to the bowl game, landed a helicopter on the Nebraska practice field in Miami, jumping out with a pipe in his mouth.

A wayward program just five years prior when Schnellenberger took charge, Miami won its 11th consecutive game to earn the school its first national title and first of four in a nine-year period.

And the Huskers, again under Tom Osborne, were left out in the cold.



1995 Orange Bowl: Nebraska 24, Miami 17


Warren SappAP Photo/Jeffrey BoanMiami's Warren Sapp was chatty, but Tommie Frazier and Nebraska got the last word and the win.


The story is part of Nebraska lore. Not the two-touchdown comeback or the prescient halftime vow to his team by Osborne that Miami would tire late -– well, that’s all legendary, too -– but Tommie Frazier’s version of the trash talk shared with Warren Sapp perhaps best symbolizes Nebraska’s rise to surpass Miami in this once-lopsided postseason series.

Osborne had replaced Frazier with Brook Berringer early, the arrangement in place for much of the 1994 regular season as blood clots sidelined Frazier for eight games.

When Frazier returned to field late in the fourth quarter, the Huskers trailed 17-9. Sapp, the Hurricanes’ boisterous defensive tackle, shot jabs at the junior quarterback.

“Where you been, Tommie,” Sapp shouted, according to Frazier.

“It’s not where I’ve been,” Frazier said in 2009, recounting the exchange. “It’s where I’m going, fat ass.”

With fresh legs, Frazier, the Florida native who came up two points short against Florida State a year earlier in the same stadium, gashed Miami on the option. With less than eight minutes to play, fullback Cory Schlesinger burst through middle for a 15-yard score. Frazier found tight end Eric Alford for a two-point conversion to tie it.

Less than five minutes later, with Frazier at the helm, Schlesinger scored again from 14 yards out. The victory secured Osborne’s first national title and one of three in his final four seasons as coach.

As usual in his college career, which concluded with 33 wins in 36 starts, Frazier had the final word.



2002 Rose Bowl: Miami 37, Nebraska 14


Andre Johnson, Daryl Jones, Carl Walker, Ken DorseyAP Photo/Mark J. TerrillMiami had 38 players go to the NFL, including Daryl Jones (L), Andre Johnson (C) and Ken Dorsey (R).


Six years before this most recent Nebraska-Miami meeting, the Cornhuskers fielded a team in 1995 that was considered by some as the greatest in history. Its average margin of victory approached 40 points. And true to form, Osborne’s team crushed Florida 62-24 in the Fiesta Bowl.

If only the 1995 Huskers could have met 2001 Miami. Because this Nebraska team had no chance. The Hurricanes, loaded with 16 future first-round NFL draft picks, blitzed the Huskers for 27 second-quarter points en route to a 34-0 halftime lead. Miami could have named its score, but coach Larry Coker showed mercy in the second half as the championship celebration began early.

The star power at Miami in 2001 was incredible, featuring running backs Clinton Portis and Frank Gore, quarterback Ken Dorsey, offensive tackle Bryant McKinnie, tight ends Jeremy Shockey and Kellen Winslow, safeties Ed Reed and Sean Taylor, linebackers Jonathan Vilma and D.J. Williams, receiver Andre Johnson, cornerbacks Phillip Buchanon and Mike Rumph, defensive tackle Vince Wilfork -- the list seems never-ending. In all, 38 players from that team were drafted. They accumulated more than 40 appearances in the Pro Bowl.

Miami outscored its opponents in 2001 by 33.2 points per game. Its offense, defense and special teams units each could lay claim to a ranking as the nation’s best.

And for all the work Nebraska accomplished in the '90s to close the gap on Miami’s dynasty of the previous decade, it looked wider than ever on Jan. 3, 2002.
They were told they would never have a chance against Nebraska, the fiercest, most powerful team in America.

Looking across the line, safety Kenny Calhoun and his Miami teammates saw big boys all right. But Miami had speed, and it had confidence, and it had its own toughness, too. Calhoun showed as much when he batted down Turner Gill’s two-point conversion pass attempt in the 1984 Orange Bowl, delivering the defining moment in one of the most memorable national championship games ever played.

Their rivalry only grew from there, Tom Osborne on the Nebraska sideline with his plodding, ball-control offense, trying to figure out a way to neutralize the warp-speed Hurricanes. Their national championship battles became referendums on strength and toughness versus speed and athleticism. Speed won twice. Then Tommie Frazier came along, trash talkin’ Warren Sapp and putting on the moves to back it up, delivering Osborne his first national championship in the 1995 Orange Bowl.

But the advantages they once used to build their dynasties seemingly have disappeared as the college football landscape has changed. The last time they met, Miami routed Nebraska for a fifth national title in the 2002 Rose Bowl.

Since then, neither school has replicated the success they had when their paths met during the 1980s and 1990s. When they play Saturday in Lincoln, their matchup will serve as another reminder that college football has moved on without them.

"Those two teams, those two decades are moments in time and I seriously doubt that they can ever be duplicated," Calhoun said. "Just basically because of recruiting, the bowl structure now, the playoff system and the NCAA regulations and rules on how they govern the game."

[+] EnlargeHoward Schnellenberger and Al Golden
AP Photo/Wilfredo LeeHoward Schnellenberger, left, led Miami to the 1983 national title. The college football landscape has changed for current Miami coach Al Golden.
So much has changed in the 30 years since the two teams met in the Orange Bowl. At the time, Nebraska had built a strength and conditioning program that was the envy of everybody across the country. The Huskers had perfected the option offense and had a strong coaching lineage, big draws for players growing up in the Plains.

Miami, meanwhile, began to focus on recruiting the South Florida area. Coach Howard Schnellenberger coined the term "State of Miami," hoping to lock down the best athletes from the three counties surrounding the school. He also brought a pro-style offense with him from his days as an NFL assistant. After Miami began having success, other programs started to follow the Hurricanes’ blueprint.

Their advantages were no longer a secret. Schools from across the country now recruit in South Florida, and are looking for speed. That includes Nebraska. Plus, there are more FBS programs in state looking for a piece of the recruiting pie. South Florida, Central Florida, Florida International and Florida Atlantic were not part of the equation during the dynasty years.

As for Nebraska, the Huskers no longer own an edge in strength and conditioning. The option offense is virtually obsolete, negating another edge it used to have. They no longer have rivalries with Kansas, Texas and Oklahoma to sell. Their closest conference "rivals" are Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

And recruiting has changed for the Huskers, too.

[+] EnlargeNebraska's Tom Osborne
AP Photo/Hans Deryk"One thing that we did have in common is, if you looked at our recruiting classes, we were usually -- Miami and Nebraska -- ranked around 20th or 30th, 35th," Tom Osborne said.
"One thing that we did have in common is, if you looked at our recruiting classes, we were usually -- Miami and Nebraska -- ranked around 20th or 30th, 35th," Osborne said. "They seemed to get a lot of players out of South Florida that lots of people didn’t know about. And we got a lot of kids out of Nebraska and other places that people didn’t know much about. We developed talent. We didn’t have as many blue-chip players, but we certainly had guys who could play."

Former Miami defensive end Kevin Fagan echoes that sentiment, believing Miami can win again with the right group of players -- a group that shows the same characteristics that his 1983 championship team showed.

"Throw away the five-star stuff and go out there and look at kids," Fagan said. "Put on the film against really good opponents. When they’re getting beat, do they have character? Look beyond the speed and vertical jump and bench press. ... Schnellenberger, that was something he was really, really good at. He looked for those tough kids that other people didn’t want. Who finds a Jim Burt, or Jim Kelly? No one thinks he’s a quarterback, but Schnellenberger did."

Since the 2001 season, only Miami has played for another national championship, in 2002. Since 2004, neither team has won a conference championship. The highest final ranking for Miami was No. 11 in 2004; for Nebraska, it was No. 14 in 2009.

"Football is still a developmental game," Osborne said. "People go about it in different ways. Every place has an offseason plan and a sophisticated strength program. I agree that we might have had an edge for a period of time, but by the '90s, I think that was pretty well gone. ... But you always look for things -- whether it’s nutrition, whether it’s academic support, whether it’s schemes -- things to give you an edge."

Miami and Nebraska are still looking.

Big Ten reporter Mitch Sherman contributed to this report.

ACC Live: Week 4 (2 ET)

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
10:14
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It is going to be an exciting weekend of football in the ACC with Clemson heading to No. 1 Florida State, Georgia Tech tripping to Virginia Tech and Miami renewing its rivalry with Nebraska. ACC reporters Andrea Adelson, Jared Shanker and Matt Fortuna meet up to discuss those matchups and more Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET.

Georgia Tech D has something to prove

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
9:00
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The scenario facing Georgia Tech’s defense this week isn’t exactly ideal.

Three wins are in the ledger, and that’s the good news. But those first three were supposed to be the easy ones, and instead, the Yellow Jackets have had to sweat out each ‘W’ thus far.

[+] EnlargeGeorgia Tech Yellow Jackets, Georgia Southern Eagles, Kevin Ellison
Mike Stewart/Associated PressGeorgia Tech's defense has had a hard time corralling its first three opponents.
In what should have served as the Yellow Jackets’ final tune-up before ACC play last week, Georgia Southern racked up 528 yards of offense and nearly pulled off the upset before a frenetic finish allowed Tech to escape with a win. Defensive coordinator Ted Roof summed up the performance is blunt fashion: “Embarrassed and disappointed,” he said.

And now comes a road game at Virginia Tech, and still so many questions on the Georgia Tech defense remain.

“We’re happy we’re 3-0, but we’re not happy with how we got there,” defensive end Adam Gotsis said. “There’s plenty of work to still be done. We’ve shown some good things, but we also have a lot of bad that we need to improve on.”

The numbers tell a relatively bleak story. Georgia Tech’s defense ranks 113th nationally in yards-per-play allowed, a particularly galling stat given the level of competition, which includes FCS Wofford and two teams from outside the Power 5. Among all Power 5 teams, only Iowa State, South Carolina and Kansas have allowed a higher yards-per-play to teams outside the Power 5 so far this season -- and they’ve played just one such game apiece. The Yellow Jackets are surrendering nearly 2 yards per play more against non-Power 5 teams than they did just a year ago.

Last week’s game, in particular, illustrated what Gotsis and Roof believe to be the biggest culprit, however.

“We shouldn’t have been in that position,” Gotsis said. “We should’ve come out and put our foot on the pedal, but we let up a bit.”

If focus was an issue in the first three weeks, Virginia Tech has the Jackets’ undivided attention.

What the Hokies also have, however, is a passing game.

Perhaps the biggest question mark on Georgia Tech’s revamped defense entering the season was the pass rush, but with two option teams in the first three weeks, that’s one area that hasn’t gotten much of a test.

That won’t be the case against the Hokies, who lead the ACC in passing attempts and have thrown the ball 52 percent of the time thus far.

With that in mind, Roof is rotating in younger players in the secondary and on the line during practice, hoping to build some much-needed depth.

“We’re looking to give more people opportunities,” Roof said. “We’ll have to rotate guys, and with that comes some growing pains. But that’s also how you develop depth.”

Gotsis was Georgia Tech’s leader in sacks among returning players with just 6.5 entering the year, but the opportunities to get after the quarterback have been rare thus far. Of the 180 plays the Jackets have faced so far, 61 percent have been runs. Even in the one game they faced a more pass-heavy team, Tulane went to battle with a freshman QB making just his second career start.

Still, the work in practice has Gostis optimistic that improvement is just around the corner.

“[The pass rush] is not where it has to be at the moment, and we lost a lot of guys who were at getting to the passer, but we’ve had some guys step up,” Gostis said. “Playing the option teams, it’s hard to get pressure on the quarterback, but when we get out there and do one-on-ones, we need to make the most of those opportunities so when we get into a game, we’re ready for it.”

Tech has just four sacks thus far -- three coming against Tulane -- but they’ve come from some encouraging sources. Gotsis praised the work of sophomore Tyler Stargel and freshman KeShun Freeman, and said he’s encouraged by the progress they’ve made in limited opportunities.

But this week is the real test, and against Virginia Tech there won’t be room for growing pains or lost focus. The Hokies have a veteran quarterback who has already toppled a top-10 team. They have two hulking running backs eager to break tackles. They have a game plan that won’t be one-dimensional.

It’s also an opportunity, and after three sluggish warm-up acts, Georgia Tech is eager to see what happens when it puts the pedal to the floor.

“It’s going to be a good battle going into Virginia Tech,” Gotsis said. “They have a very experienced O-line coming back and it’ll be good to get some young guys in for us and get a good rotation going and get some pressures and some sacks.”

ACC morning links

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
8:00
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When operating out of an option-based offense, it is no secret converting third downs -- preferably third-and-short -- is of pivotal importance. So the Georgia Tech offense's ability to sustain drives is a priority in every game as long as Paul Johnson is the Yellow Jackets' coach.

Through three weeks, few teams are better than Georgia Tech at converting third-down attempts. Only one team, in fact. The Yellow Jackets rank No. 2 nationally with a 64 percent conversion rate, according to a post from Ken Sugiura of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The Georgia Tech offense, however, has done that against the likes of FCS Wofford, Tulane and recent FBS addition Georgia Southern. The unit will get its first test Saturday against Virginia Tech, which has been terrific at getting off the field; the Hokies are No. 3 nationally, allowing opponents to convert only 23.3 percent of third-down attempts.

If the Yellow Jackets find success moving the chains, they face another test once they near the Virginia Tech goal line. The Hokies are No. 15 nationally in red zone defense, allowing opponents to score on 66.7 percent of its trips. They are No. 35 in red zone touchdown percentage at 50.

The Tech-Tech showdown has traditionally been a heated game, as five of the last six games have been decided by a single score. The last two meetings have been low scoring, too, so third-down and red zone defense will be of critical importance Saturday.
  • The quarterback situation at Miami might not be any clearer without Kevin Olsen. Freshman Brad Kaaya is starting, but senior Ryan Williams, who tore his ACL in the spring, is nearing a return. Miami coach Al Golden would not commit to sticking with Kaaya once Williams is ready to play.
  • Florida State offensive tackle Cam Erving stymied Clemson's Vic Beasley last season, and that will once again be a one-on-one battle that figures to play an important part in deciding Saturday's winner between the two nationally ranked teams.
  • Clemson coach Dabo Swinney still feels Clemson would beat Florida State five out of 10 times. He initially said that after last season's disaster in Death Valley.
  • Virginia Tech has struggled mightily to run the football the last two weeks, so the Hokies are hoping Trey Edmunds comes back sooner rather than later from a tibia injury.
  • It initially looked bleak for two Duke linemen, but coach David Cutcliffe said Lucas Patrick and Dezmond Johnson avoided serious injuries Saturday. However, the offensive and defensive lines are preparing as if they will not have either this coming weekend.
  • Louisville quarterback Will Gardner was pulled in the loss against Virginia, and Gardner is putting the blame squarely on his own shoulders. And keep Reggie Bonnafon, who replaced Gardner on Saturday, in your thoughts as he deals with the death of his father.
  • After a loss to ECU a season ago, North Carolina coach Larry Fedora would be shocked if his team had the audacity to overlook the Pirates a second straight season. ECU, of course, upset Virginia Tech last weekend.
  • NC State coach Dave Doeren offered coachspeak when asked if the Wolfpack already had its eyes on No. 1 Florida State. He insists Presbyterian has his focus.
  • Syracuse coach Scott Shafer might have talked with Doeren, too. He offered a similar response, although the Orange have former member Maryland before a game against Notre Dame.
  • Boston College coach Steve Addazio had an out-of-character week of practice leading up to Pittsburgh because of a short week. He lightened the intensity. He learned his lesson in advance of the USC game, and it clearly paid off as the Eagles manhandled the then-No. 9 Trojans.
  • Canaan Severin was buried on the depth chart last season, and many of those players ahead of him returned for 2014. However, Severin has started two games already this season.
  • Pitt has not decided who will play center against Iowa.

Addazio gives Crowther's parents game ball

September, 16, 2014
Sep 16
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Following Boston College’s upset victory over No. 9 USC on Saturday night -- during which the team paid tribute to former BC lacrosse player Welles Crowther, who was killed saving lives in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks -- coach Steve Addazio presented a game ball to Crowther’s parents.

“We celebrated this game because we celebrated Welles. We celebrated him as a BC man,” Addazio said in front of his football team in a video posted by BC on Tuesday (above). “We celebrated his selflessness, and his ability to put other people ahead of himself. Service to others, it’s what our university stands for. Someone who had an opportunity to do something for other people and he paid the ultimate sacrifice to do that.”

BC honored Crowther by putting red bandanna patterns on its helmets, cleats and gloves and on gear worn by the coaching stuff. The red bandanna was Crowther’s signature, and something he was wearing as he saved the lives of a dozen people in the South Tower of the World Trade Center before he was killed in its collapse.

Crowther’s father, Jefferson, said receiving this football meant even more to him than the Emmy presented to him for ESPN’s OTL segment -- “The Man In The Red Bandanna” (video below) -- which told the story of Welles’ heroism of Sept. 11.

“For you guys to present this to us tonight is incredible,” he said.

After Jefferson mentioned how much he liked the way the cleats looked, one of the BC players -- Manny Asprilla -- gave him the shoes off his feet.

video

Familiar foe awaits Pitt's Paul Chryst

September, 16, 2014
Sep 16
5:11
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Manasseh Garner was playing a different position at a different school in 2010, so forgive him if he does not know exactly how to attack Iowa's defense. But the former Wisconsin defensive end and current Pitt receiver is in a familiar spot this week as his Panthers ready to welcome the Hawkeyes to Heinz Field.

"It seems long, but it really seems like it was just yesterday," Garner laughed.

[+] EnlargeManasseh Garner
Gregory J. Fisher/USA TODAY SportsPanthers WR Manasseh Garner and his head coach will face a familiar opponent in Iowa in Week 4.
He's not alone.

Garner and third-year Pitt head coach Paul Chryst will recognize what they see across the field Saturday, having become quite familiar with Iowa in their previous lives at Wisconsin, where Chryst was the offensive coordinator. Chryst went 3-3 when the Heartland Trophy was up for grabs against Iowa, with the effects of the game usually leaving marks on his players in one fashion or another. The Badgers averaged just 18 points in those six games, and they failed to crack even that much on four different occasions.

There are new faces now, sure, most notably with Phil Parker having taken over as Iowa's defensive coordinator in 2012, replacing Norm Parker (no relation), who died this past January. But many of the hallmarks of 16th-year head coach Kirk Ferentz's program remain the same.

"I have a tremendous amount of respect for Kirk Ferentz, and it's going to be a well-coached team," Chryst said. "He believes in physical offense, physical defense. It's always going to be a challenge. I'm excited for our guys to play. It's going to be a good atmosphere. It'll be a good physical game, and we've got to rise up and meet that challenge. It's a great opportunity for us. The amount of success that he's had for a long time -- there's a lot of programs across the country trying to do that."

Chryst and Garner have had the last laugh against Iowa since 2010, escaping Kinnick Stadium with a 31-30 win that helped propel their Wisconsin squad to the first of three straight Rose Bowls, two of which they were a part of.
Four years later, Garner remembers the feeling of his lone meeting with the Hawkeyes.

"Just the physical nature that they bring -- I feel like Big Ten teams, they pride themselves on being physical, physical, physical," Garner said. "Relentless, four quarters, smash mouth. So that's one of the things I really got to see in my two years up in the Big Ten. That was something at Wisconsin, something we took pride in, wear and tearing you, and beating you to the punch, making sure that you felt the beatdown through four quarters. I'm sure that's what Iowa's preaching to their players as well. We're a physical team, smash-mouth and we want to wear you down. And that's one of the things that I've seen and I've witnessed, I went through it when playing them at their house. They're definitely a physical team and I respect them for being the team that they are."

Saturday will be akin to the unstoppable force meeting the immovable object, as Pitt enters as the nation's No. 3 rushing team (1,086 yards), while Iowa ranks seventh against the run (65.67 yards per game). James Conner, the burly 250-pound sophomore, leads the nation with 544 rushing yards, and is the ideal antidote for a stout front-seven.

Chryst said he looks forward to facing teams like Iowa, knowing that every yard comes with a price. Asked if he sees Chryst putting a similar stamp on the Panthers, Garner couldn't help but laugh.

"Oh without question, yeah," Garner said. "That's one of the main things Coach emphasizes: Let it go, let it go. Don't hold anything back. Just be instinctive and be physical. You have nothing if you're not physical, especially in this type of offense. Your front men, if they're not laying a foundation, (if) they're not winning the fight at the line of scrimmage, you really have nothing."

ACC Upset Watch: Week 4

September, 16, 2014
Sep 16
3:00
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Two teams we had on upset watch last week ended up losing: Louisville and Virginia Tech. That is all the warning needed for this week's edition.

Eds note: We are including ACC underdogs with a chance to pull upsets, too.

1. Maryland (2-1) at Syracuse (2-0), 12:30 p.m., ESPN3. Line: Syracuse by 2. The Orange posted a 40-3 win against Central Michigan last week. That counts as a big win considering the double-overtime scare they survived in Week 1. Still, how much do we really know about Syracuse right now? Is Terrel Hunt as good as he was last week or as average as he was in the first half against Villanova? Is the defense as feisty as the one we saw against the Chippewas or the one that was not very physical against Villanova? Maryland has not exactly impressed anyone with a close win over USF and then a 40-37 loss to West Virginia last week in which the Mountaineers ran 108 plays and Clint Trickett passed for 511 yards. Still, the Terps have a veteran quarterback in C.J. Brown and top-notch receiver in Stefon Diggs -- two players who missed Syracuse's 20-3 win against Maryland a year ago.

2. Army (1-1) at Wake Forest (1-2), 3:30 p.m., ESPN3. Line: Army by 2. Wake Forest has not exactly given its fans reason for hope but the Deacs did show signs of life last week in a loss to Utah State. After trailing 29-7 at halftime, Wake Forest cut the deficit to 29-21 before losing 36-24. Turnovers have been a huge killer in both losses. Last week, the Aggies scored on a pick-six and a fumble return for a touchdown. ULM also scored on a pick-six in the opener to win 17-10. If Wake Forest can limit such damaging mistakes, then they will be in some games down the road. Because the defense is respectable. Better than respectable, actually, ranking in the top half of the ACC in total defense, scoring defense and rushing defense. Wake Forest beat Army last season and has won seven straight in the series. The Demon Deacons are 6-0 vs. Army at BB&T Field and have not lost to the Black Knights since 1989.

3. North Carolina (2-0) at East Carolina (2-1), 3:30 p.m., ESPNU. Line: East Carolina by 2. The Pirates are riding high after their win against Virginia Tech, and have something else going for them, too -- they embarrassed North Carolina in Chapel Hill one season ago. So if Shane Carden and company had a huge day against the Tar Heels last season, what will prevent them from having a big day against the Tar Heels this year? North Carolina ranks No. 94 in the nation in passing yards allowed (average 265 per game) and has been in a dogfight with its first two opponents -- neither of them as good as East Carolina. Meanwhile, the North Carolina offense will be without starting guard Landon Turner, and is expected to start true freshman Jared Cohen in his place. But not all is bleak. North Carolina can score with the best of them, and the Tar Heels will not overlook the Pirates the way they did a season ago. With a week off to prepare, North Carolina will be ready.

4. Virginia (2-1) at BYU (3-0), 3:30 p.m., ESPN. Line: BYU by 15. The Cougars have looked the part in the early going, but Virginia has not been a walkover for anybody. Virginia was not even a walkover for BYU last season -- the Hoos beat the Cougars to start the season before everything else went south. So how can Virginia pull the upset? Follow the same blueprint it did last week in a win over Louisville. Virginia totally shut down dual-threat quarterback Brett Hundley so the Hoos will have that experience under their belts when they take on dual-threat Taysom Hill. The Hoos also have been terrific at creating turnovers. Their nine turnovers gained is tied for second in the country. The offense still has to find some consistency and a ground game, but with a take-charge defense leading the way, Virginia will be a threat to pull off the upset.
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If Clemson has been busy cooking up a few new wrinkles for Florida State during the bye week, the trigger men on offense certainly aren't tipping their hand.

Chad Morris loves Deshaun Watson, but he downplayed the freshman's role in Saturday's game plan.

QB Cole Stoudt wants to look deep a bit more often against Florida State, but of course, he'll take what he's given.

The Seminoles haven't exactly looked as dominant on defense as they did a season ago, but don't go asking the Tigers if they've found a weakness to exploit.

"It's all in the strategy and game plan," Stoudt said. "We could have the same thing [as earlier games]. We could have something different. We'll mix it up."

In other words, don't bother asking. You'll find out Saturday.

But just because Clemson isn't touting any matchup advantages this week doesn't mean it hasn't been studying hard for what promises to be its biggest test of the season.

There's some juicy tape to watch on both sides of this matchup, Morris said, and that's a good thing.

Clemson's offensive hibernation in the second half against Georgia was an eye opener, and the fireworks the freshmen set off a week later against South Carolina State provided some much-needed reps for some inexperienced offensive talent.

On the flip side, Oklahoma State helped magnify some of the weak links on Florida State's defense, and while Morris certainly isn't suggesting the Seminoles aren't still loaded with talent, he said one of the big takeaways of the early season has been how much FSU misses some of last year's key contributors.

"The guys they lost were big-time players," Morris said. "To find the right combination -- they're a lot like we are offensively -- it takes some time to find the guys to play that role. The dynamics for them have changed because of the playmakers they've lost. That's what you see out of the first two games with those guys."

[+] EnlargeCole Stoudt
Dale Zanine/USA TODAY SportsThere are plenty of unanswered questions for QB Cole Stoudt and Clemson's offense as the Tigers enter their Week 4 game at Florida State.
That's what makes this matchup so intriguing. FSU is trying to adjust to life without Telvin Smith and Christian Jones and Timmy Jernigan up front. Clemson is wondering just how sharp its offense can be with Sammy Watkins and Tajh Boyd gone and Stoudt and a cast of unknowns taking their place.

The first two games of the season set a template. This week's matchup should answer some major questions for both teams.

"Even if you're a veteran, you haven't gotten into the groove of playing and first games are like Forrest Gumps. They're a box of chocolates, you never know what you're going to get," Jimbo Fisher said of his young defenders in new roles. "At time we were in good shape and at time we became hesitant. Those are things we can't let happen, you have to go and play those guys and that's what we did last week and we'll continue to do this week."

The same is true on Clemson's offense, where Morris spent much of Week 2 giving his young talent a long look. Watson saw increased action and looked sharp. Freshman receiver Artavis Scott emerged with six catches for 164 yards and a TD. Adam Choice and Wayne Gallman -- both freshmen -- led the ground game.

The strong running of the young backs is particularly encouraging as Clemson looks to establish a ground game against a battered Florida State front.

"Those guys are good," Clemson defensive lineman D.J. Reader said. "They work hard in practice, and there's a bunch of guys back there that run hard. They find the holes."

But, of course, big numbers against South Carolina State won't mean much against Florida State.

"They've got to continue to grow, absolutely," Morris said. "We knew they would be great players for us, but it's bringing them along at the right time."

For Florida State, the bye week has provided some answers. Defensive tackle Eddie Goldman returned to practice this week and should be good to go against Clemson. Linebacker Ukeme Eligwe could be back, too, which would be a huge boost to the Seminoles' defensive front.

At Clemson, Morris thinks he has a better handle on his players, too, even if he's not sharing much of that information yet.

Will Watson play more? Will FSU's young linemen take a step forward? Will the Tigers' ground game be a focal point?

That's the fun of a mid-September matchup, really. No one really knows much of anything yet.

"We'll have to see when we get to game day what works best," Stoudt said. "Sometimes you go into games thinking one thing and then something else works better. We'll have to see when we get out there."

Wake uses Kim K. and Photoshop to recruit

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It isn't entirely original. As Matt Fortuna detailed in this piece last week, schools have been using graphic design and creating fake magazine covers for a while now to amuse and impress recruits.

Just a few weeks ago, Tennessee created a Rolling Stone cover with Beyonce and Shy Tuttle, one of the Vols' top targets in this year's class.

But the one Wake Forest recently sent to Class of 2015 defensive end Kengera Daniel really caught our eye.



It's safe to say this wasn't the best Photoshop we've ever seen. And fans across the country will no doubt get a chuckle from the claim that the ACC is "the real power conference in college football."

And "KimGera?" Well, we're not sure what to make of that.

But it's not us the Demon Deacons were trying to impress. It's the 6-foot-5, 240-pound senior from Raleigh, North Carolina. And apparently it worked -- even though he has no idea how the Wake staff found out he's a fan of Kim Kardashian, whom they even dressed up in the Deacons' black and gold colors.

"It did impress," Daniel told ESPN.com. "But I haven't really told anyone I was a Kim K. fan. I guess they assume all guys are. But it's a cool edit."

Will it ultimately work? We'll find out Sept. 22. That's when Daniel said he'll release his top 5 finalists.

ECU looks to do it again vs. ACC

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Ruffin McNeill has not approached East Carolina's rugged three-game nonconference stretch here as proving grounds. The fifth-year Pirates coach has always believed his teams belong with whoever they're playing, Power 5 program or not. They entered South Carolina two weeks ago intending to leave with a win, the same way they entered this past weekend at Virginia Tech, the same way they will approach a home tilt with North Carolina this Saturday.

"We did not go down thinking 'upset,'" McNeill told ESPN.com, referring to the loss to the Gamecocks. "We went down expecting to win, and that's saying it as humble as I can. And that's how much I believe in our staff and our team."

[+] EnlargeShane Carden
Jeremy Brevard/USA TODAY SportsThrough three games this season, East Carolina senior QB Shane Carden has already thrown for 1,031 yards and seven touchdowns.
Such a mentality hardly hindered ECU last season during its 100-plus mile trip to Chapel Hill, as the Pirates had their way with the Tar Heels in a 55-31 rout. It helped earn them more notoriety nationally three days ago in Blacksburg, Virginia, as they jumped on the Hokies early and scored late for a 28-21 win.

This week? ECU is actually favored over in-state neighbor UNC, the first-year American Athletic Conference program looking to make it back-to-back wins against the Heels before it embarks on league play.

"Oh it's been brought up since we lost to them," UNC safety Tim Scott said. "For 365. Every day our coaches remind us if we don't come ready to play, they already showed us the results when we don't come to play and this year we're trying to make sure that doesn't happen again."

To do that, UNC needs to do what it couldn't do last season, and what few have been able to do since, including NC State late in 2013: Stop Shane Carden.

Carden accounted for six total touchdowns last season against the Heels, throwing for 376 yards. Saturday at Virginia Tech, he was responsible for all four ECU touchdowns and threw for 427 yards. The Houston native's rise has mirrored that of his staff's, each in their fifth years in Greenville.

With McNeill getting hired at ECU roughly two weeks before signing day, Carden appeared to be Stephen F. Austin-bound. Former Texas Tech quarterback B.J. Symons, who had played for the Red Raiders while McNeill was an assistant there, called McNeill about Carden, whose dad was Symons' wife's boss. Carden visited ECU, was intrigued by the idea of running an offense designed by Mike Leach proteges and signed with the Pirates a week later.

"He's always been pretty strong on the mental toughness, the leadership, being one of the guys, the guy that they can rally behind," offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Lincoln Riley told ESPN.com. "Some of that can be taught, but some of that is natural, God-given ability. Sometimes people just follow people and you can't really nail down exactly why. Some people just have that presence about them, and Shane has that."

Carden's first career pass was picked off, at South Carolina in 2012. But he found his footing late that year, leading the Pirates to five wins in their final six regular-season games, during which they scored 42 points per game. Last season, Carden finished in the top-10 nationally of virtually every passing category, leading ECU to a 10-3 mark while making a leap that McNeill described as going from the quarterback of the offense to the quarterback of the team.

"He works every day like he's losing his job, and he works on his craft," said McNeill, who played defensive back at ECU from 1976-80. "The kids call him cap'n: C-A-P-apostrophe-N."

The 31-year-old Riley, meanwhile, has become one of the hottest names on the assistant coaching circuit, based largely off his work with Carden and before that with Michael Crabtree, whom he mentored when coaching receivers at Texas Tech.

Everything seems to be falling into place right now for ECU, which has one of its favorite sons ushering it into this new era in a new league.

"I'm beginning to see it come into fruition, because one thing with Coach (Steve) Spurrier and Coach (Frank) Beamer: They don't just win for a season, they win for seasons, and I would like to get our program where it's understood that we are going to be successful for seasons, not a season," McNeill said. "And the belief and commitment to the team and belief and commitment to our mission and vision -- it's very important that that is continued."

Another win Saturday over a bigger program from down the road would only further that progress, as it would make ECU 4-1 against the ACC in the past two years and serve notice to the rest of its new league brethren.

"You always hear about teams that went undefeated or only lost one game and everybody says, 'Who'd they play?' And they don't have anything to show for it," Carden said. "Well, ECU always has a chance to play these good teams and give us a chance to put our name in the mix with some big-name schools if we go out and win those games."

Weekend recruiting wrap: ACC 

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Though next weekend begins the bulk of the key recruiting weekends in ACC play featuring some of the nation's top prospects on campuses within the conference, this past weekend featured a key commitment for Virginia Tech, and one of the Miami Hurricanes' top commitments making an unofficial visit to an SEC power.

Planning for success: Virginia

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In the hours after his team sprung the upset of Louisville on Saturday, Virginia linebacker Henry Coley dialed up head coach Mike London, asking what the protocol was for calling a team meeting Sunday. The high of beating the No. 21 team in the country had worn off, and Coley and his three fellow Cavaliers captains needed to ensure that the rest of their teammates were not looking back.

"They told us we can't just get complacent, because in the past two years we started off 2-0, 2-1 and then we ended up going 4-8 (and 2-10)," safety Brandon Phelps told ESPN.com. "They said we've got to find it in ourselves to keep this thing going, to stay motivated, to stay hungry so we can win some games."

[+] EnlargeVirginia's Mike London
Geoff Burke/USA TODAY SportsAfter going winless in the ACC last season, coach Mike London and Virginia are already 1-0 following an upset of No. 21 Louisville.
Through three weeks, the Hoos have already matched last year's win total, and they were dangerously close to upsetting then-No. 7 UCLA in Week 1. Awaiting them this weekend is a trip to Provo, Utah, to face a BYU team that has replaced Louisville at No. 21 in the AP poll. The Cougars boast a dynamic dual-threat quarterback in Taysom Hill. According to ESPN's Football Power Index, they have the nation's best chance at an undefeated regular-season record (21.7 percent).

But discussion about what the College Football Playoff selection committee should do in the event a schedule-challenged independent team runs the table is the last thing on the minds of the Hoos, who are used to being overlooked. BYU, after all, was one of only two teams to lose to Virginia last season during an otherwise-hapless year for the ACC program.

Phelps said that last year's two-win season was embarrassing, and that the players carried that sting this offseason through everything from workout competitions to video-game battles in order to stoke the competitive edge. Still, in what looked to be (and still is) a wide-open Coastal Division, Virginia entered the season as an afterthought, and Phelps said he and his teammates have embraced the underdog role.

Through three games, the Hoos have shown signs that this year won't be a repeat of last year. The defense has been relentless up front, tallying 12 sacks (No. 6 nationally) and allowing just 2.62 yards per rush (No. 16). That will be tested against the elusive Hill, whose 356 rushing yards this season trail only Boston College's Tyler Murphy (401) among quarterbacks. BYU runs more than 85 plays per game, fourth-most nationally. And its home field, LaVell Edwards Stadium, sits more than 4,600 feet above sea level, with the altitude further stretching visiting teams physically.

Fans ran onto the field at Scott Stadium this past weekend after Virginia's win over Louisville, marking the home team's first field-storming since an upset over 12th-ranked Georgia Tech three years ago. The milestone meant plenty to London, who was emotional afterward and whose job has been the topic of much discussion after a winless league campaign a year ago.

His players are well-aware of the hot-seat talk, and they were thrilled to help change the narrative.

"He's doesn't think about it, we don't think about it," Phelps said. "We're going to go out and play for him and we're going to win games. He's a great coach. He really cares about each and every single one of his players, and it's a great feeling to see a big smile on his face after we won that game."

The most important gesture, however, came back in the locker room following London's postgame speech, as he said that one player held the rest up to deliver parting words on the dawn of another game week.

"(He) said, 'Hey, listen, don't do anything dumb tonight. We've still got a long way to go. We've got to focus on getting ready for BYU,' " London said. "That type of leadership is the kind that can take you a long way. There's a buy-in to these guys, and we'll continue to keep having that buy-in because we've got really good opponents ahead of us, but the first one, what's foremost on our mind is BYU."
Pitt's off to a 3-0 start, and while some early struggles against FIU last week were enough to put a scare into the Panthers, there's no question they're now squarely in the mix for the Coastal Division. A win this week would give Pitt its first 4-0 start since 2000.

Of course, for the hype to keep building, Pitt will need to pounce on reeling Iowa this weekend, and the Pittsburgh Tribune Review expects Paul Chryst to open up the playbook a bit.
In three games, Pitt has thrown for only 304 yards, which is just short of 23 percent of the offense and only about 100 yards per game. [James] Conner is overshadowing the passing game, running for 544 of Pitt's 1,033 yards on the ground. Quarterback Chad Voytik's 29 completions in 50 attempts have gained only 284 yards, an average of less than 10 per completion.

Through three weeks, Pitt has thrown 53 passes out of 213 plays -- or about 25 percent of the time. The only FBS schools passing less often so far this year are the three service academies, Georgia Tech, Georgia Southern and New Mexico.

That's a sharp change from last season, when Pitt threw the ball 47 percent of the time, but it's also a game plan that's been easy to follow with the success of tailback James Conner. His 80 rushes are 14 more than any other Power 5-conference back, and only two other Power 5 rushers are within 100 yards of his rushing total this season.

Still, there will come a point in which the Panthers need to show they can move the ball through the air, too, and that remains something of a questions with new QB Chad Voytik at the helm.

Chryst already took the time to bench his QB for a series against FIU last week, a move he explained as an opportunity for Voytik to “catch his breath.”

Voytik hasn't been bad, but he also hasn't been asked to do too much. His attempts-per-game is the lowest among ACC starters outside of Georgia Tech, his yards-per-attempt is ahead of only Tyler Murphy in the conference, and his 58 percent completions ranks 10th, trailing true freshman Brad Kaaya.

The fact remains that Conner and the ground game will be Pitt's bread and butter this year, but getting Voytik some reps in advance of a tougher ACC slate that will have him face off against the stout defenses at Virginia and Virginia Tech to kick off the month of October is probably a wise decision.

Conner has been astounding thus far, but the workload has been heavy, and Pitt also has another budding superstar named Tyler Boyd who needs to be fed a few more touches, too.

Some more links for your Tuesday reading:
  • DeVante Parker is getting some high-tech help in healing his foot injury, writes The Courier-Journal. His return can't come soon enough. The Cards are already having QB concerns, and the receiving corps hasn't exactly wowed anyone. Louisville's top two wideouts — Eli Rogers (20 targets) and James Quick (18) — have caught just 57 percent of their targets and averaged 5.9 yards per target. Last year, Parker caught 69 percent and averaged 11 yards per attempt.
  • Ryan Williams' continued progress recovering from an ACL injury means Miami isn't worried about QB depth following Kevin Olsen's suspension, writes the Miami Herald.
  • North Carolina will be without guard Landon Turner for its matchup with ECU, notes CBS Sports. Turner was UNC's most experienced lineman (19 career starts), and the Tar Heels already ranked just 51st out of 65 Power 5 teams when running between the tackles.
  • Don't expect Chad Morris to slow his offense to keep Florida State off the field, writes The Post and Courier.
  • The emergence of Derrick Mitchell on Florida State's defensive line is a much-needed boost for the ailing Seminoles, writes the Miami Herald.
  • For Virginia, the early success this season is all about having an identity, writes the Daily Progress.
  • Virginia Tech is optimistic Corey Marshall will be able to play this week when the Hokies open up their ACC slate, writes the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

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